650F

A major Signature innovation of a Module transom design which allows one of 3 or more different transom layouts in the same boat.

  1. Full size engine well with twin live bait tanks with viewing windows and transom.
  2. Full size engine well with no live bait tanks, folding outboard flap and transom door.
  3. Full size engine well with single live bait tank transom door and lounge provision.

 

  • Full Nexus Liner
  • Side door option
  • Room on the dash for 15" screen electronics
  • Extra large cockpit area
  • Sleeps 2, with optional lockable sliding cabin door
  • Rated for 7 people
  • Signature Variable Deadrise Hull – SVDH
  • Walk around deck for easy access to bow
  • Self bailing deck option
  • Built to Australian & ABYC standards
  • 370L fuel capacity makes the 650F a long range fishing weapon

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Length 6.50m
Beam 2.50m
Deadrise 21−33"
Fuel 370L
Water 38L (option)
Berths 2
Power outboard 200HP V6 - 250HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 280kg
Hull weight approx. 1,250kg
Towing weight approx. 2,200kg
BMT length approx. 7.60m
BMT height approx. 2.45m
BMT width approx. 2.50m
Max people 7/630kg
Max load 900kg

Haines Signature 650F - Trade A Boat Magazine BACK


The Haines Signature 650F is the flagship of the Haines Group’s 18-model fishing boat fleet.

One of the latest additions to the Haines Group range of fishing boats is the Signature 650F. One of the brand’s largest fishing boats, it’s sure to impress anglers dedicated to offshore fishing and much more.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 650F

 

A first glance of the Haines Signature 650F revealed it is not your standard 6.5m boat, it looks far bigger than what it actually is. In fact it looks more like a 7m boat with its big shoulders flowing into the new hardtop, as well as a maximum beam of 2.5m standing out.

It’s on board where space has really been maximised to its full limit and again you get the feeling of being on a larger boat as the deck space is huge and uncluttered. As per normal the Signature gunwales are set up high and are comfortable and secure to lean against, with that height maintained right through to the transom, which I like.

The transom also comes in three configurations, namely: a single livewell with viewing window, transom door and storage; a dual livewell setup with storage; and a third with seating configuration and storage. I think it’s a great idea having the different options suited to both fishing and family boating.

 

LAYOUT

 

Among other notable features on the Haines Signature 650F are the sidepockets which are definitely wider than usual and actually protrude slightly out from the coaming line. It was evident that you can load them with more gear, use them as dedicated steps, plus you can mount larger rod racks without having the reels protruding into the deck. It also allows for thicker bolster pads to be run around the coaming edges while still being vertically uniform.

Next to note are two large under-sole fishbins with flush-mount deck hatches on either side of the keel line. They may not be ultra-deep but are long and could take decent-size mackerel without having to snap them in half, as well as both taking a good couple of kilos of other fish and ice without an issue. Both bins are plumbed for drainage.

Up front the new hardtop stands out; its large split windscreen and large side windows provide plenty of light and ventilation and there is space to mount a few accessories, while the stainless steel rear frame and launchers give the setup a nice, modern look.

The helm seats are mounted on adjustable frames that can house large Eskys within to serve as fishboxes, extra watertight storage and/or seating. Between the seats is another flush-mount hatch, so definitely no shortage when it comes to the storage options on this boat.

At the helm the dedicated captain’s dash is hinged to the bulkhead making for easy access in mounting steering and electronics. The dash angle is quite vertical and is a preference of mine rather than those you struggle to see electronics on when seated or standing at the stern. The captain’s seat also has a flip-up bolster and on either side of the seats are recessed sidepockets with stainless steel drinkholders, footrests and a lockable glove box on the passenger side.

The cabin has a lockable sliding door, full bunks, sidepockets, LED lighting, storage below the bunks, large top hatch for anchor access to the bow and even a portable toilet for those not prepared to go au naturel overboard.

 

HANDLING AND RIDE

 

When it’s time to head out for a day on the water there’s no doubt the Signature 650F is designed for long days and long distances, considering the 370lt fuel capacity. As tested this 650F was fitted with the maximum horsepower rating of 250, and a Suzuki 250 four-stroke to be precise.

 As the ‘whisperers’ of four-strokes it always amazes me at just how quiet these Suzuki motors are, even up in the large horsepower range.

On the throttle the Haines Signature 650F leaps onto the plane effortlessly, and that was even with four men aboard. From holeshot to WOT it’s a quick transition and with a bit of extra trimming a speed of 43.5kts can be achieved. That’s pretty quick on a boat of this size although, like with any outboard, you will chew up a bit of extra gas.

The balance of ride and performance included good stability at both rest and underway, as well as the hull tucking into turns nicely with a locked-in trim. Overall it was an easy and comfortable boat to drive considering the size.

 

THE VERDICT

 

Normally, Signature boats come with loads of extra features and accessories. Now don’t get me wrong, the Haines Signature 650F is still loaded with some really good features and accessories, enough to get on the water in quite a flashy boat. Interestingly, though, these have been kept a bit more on the simple side allowing Signature to produce one hell of a fishing boat and in my opinion, at one hell of a good price considering its size and what it has to offer.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 650F SEA TRIALS

Single 250hp Suzuki four-stroke outboard motor

RPM

SPEED (kts)

FUEL BURN (lt/h)

650

2.5

1.7

1000

4.2

3.5

1500

5.4

5.5

2000

6.7

9.3

2500

8.5

14.8

3000

3.2

20.5

3500

22.5

25.2

4000

26.7

29.7

4500

31.3

39

5000

35.8

51.9

5500

38.5

64.9

6000

43.5

83.6

* Sea-trial data supplied by the author.

 

HIGHS

• Bigger is better

• Maximum deck space

• Transom and gunwale setup

• Large flush-deck killtanks

• Large fuel capacity

• Price

 

LOWS

• Add trim tabs (personal preference, but it doesn’t have to have them)

• Prefer batteries raised off the deck

• Needs a slightly wider grabrail on rear of hardtop

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 650F SPECIFICATIONS

PRICE AS TESTED

Haines Signature 650F price: $102,977

 

OPTIONS FITTED

Sliding cabin door with lock, hardtop and accessories, stainless steel ladder, recessed cockapit lighting, livebait tank, deckwash, transom door and lounge, VHF radio, Signature pattern gelcoat, lighting strips, Suzuki DF250TX outboard motor, stainless steel prop, Garmin electronics, fuel filter, and Dunbier trailer

 

PRICED FROM

$75,885 (BMT)

 

GENERAL

MATERIAL Fibreglass

TYPE Planing monohull

LENGTH 6.5m    

BEAM 2.5m

WEIGHT 1250kg

DEADRISE 21 to 33°

 

CAPACITIES

PEOPLE (DAY) 7

PEOPLE (NIGHT) 2           

REC. HP 175       

REC. MAX HP 250            

FUEL 370lt          

WATER 40lt (optional)

 

ENGINE

MAKE/MODEL Suzuki DF250TX outboard motor

TYPE V6 four-stroke petrol outboard motor

RATED HP 250

DISPLACEMENT 3.614cm³

WEIGHT 263kg  

GEAR RATIO 2.29:1

 

SUPPLIED BY

Australian Marine Centre

3491 Pacific Highway,

Slacks Creek, QLD, 4127

Phone (07) 3808 7333

Web amcboats.com.au

 

Words By Kevin Smith

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/1502/haines-signature-650f-review/

Haines Signature 650F - Fishing Monthly Magazine BACK


Words By Wayne Kempe

Review supplied by Fishing Monthly Magazine

http://www.fishingmonthly.com.au/Articles/Display/17929-Haines-Signature-650F-Hard-Top


As the largest of the Haines Signature F series craft, the 650F Hard Top is regarded by many fishing and boating enthusiasts as arguably the ultimate trailerable fishing boat.

The point is that this craft just has so much going for it, from the beautifully proportioned lines of the sleek fibreglass hull, neat cuddy cab and high cockpit sides, all linked to enough standard fishing features to satisfy any angler wanting to have the lot at the finger tips. And there are a lot of options! In the reviewed craft alone they stretched from outrigger poles to an auto pilot, massive Garmin unit and other goodies. And let’s not overlook the ride from the variable deadrise hull. In all, the ride was very enjoyable whether just cruising or really punching along.

The 650F offers several transom options for the buyer; the reviewed craft being equipped with a full size engine well, clear sided recirculating live well plus a locking transom door.

Power anchor winch the way to go

The reviewed 650F was anchor winch equipped. I feel that most owners would opt for a power winch in lieu of accessing the anchor hatch via the cabin’s front hatch. It’s possible to go forward to the front of the 650’s cabin making use of various hard top hand holds (which I did on the beach) but I could not see this being viable at sea. When leaving the craft from the front, the large bow rail offered excellent security.

Within the 650 F’s cabin, I noted ample headroom, soft lining, overhead pockets plus plenty of light from windows. Excellent cushions would allow a couple to sleep in comfort and there were generously large storage lockers under the 2m+ bunks. Entry was via a locking sliding door.

Note that an under floor compartment was located just outside the cabin door and would be handy for the skipper and first mate’s tucker or cold drinks.

With a fully enclosed hardtop on a stainless steel frame the 650F’s helm area and forward seating were thoroughly weather protected thanks to the shelter provided by the hard top and wiper equipped curved windscreen up front, paired sliding side windows. Note that cockpit lights were set into the rear of the targa framework with some 7 rod holders up top.

Dual instrument area

The craft’s full width moulded dash area incorporated a locking glove box with a grab handle under it for the first mate; a side pocket with drink holder at the elbow. The 650F’s main dash area was a split system in that Garmin GMI 20 gauges monitoring the Suzuki 250 were set up above the windscreen, within the hard top’s return, along with a VHF marine radio and compass. In this location it would only take a glance upwards for the skipper to keep in touch.

Directly ahead of the helm seating was a very neat moulded binnacle with a padded lip providing shade over the craft’s (optional) Garmin GPS Map 8015 unit. The craft’s 3-spoke wheel was directly below with banks of rocker switches set each side, as well as under, the wheel. Controls for the craft’s GHP auto pilot (another option) were prominent while the Suzuki 250’s forward controls, featuring Suzuki’s ultra smooth Precision Control System, were side mounted along with an ignition key plus other controls, among them being trim tab activators.

In all it was a very neat dash layout, definitely highlighted by the fact that the moulded binnacle could be unlocked from the adjacent moulding and tilted back to allow access to the extremely neat wiring tucked behind it. Without doubt this was one of the best set ups I’ve seen; a marine mechanic’s dream come true.

Forward seating was of deluxe standard with slide adjustable bolster fronted buckets (featuring double stitched upholstery) mounted on rigid stainless frames and affording both skipper and first mate highest levels of visibility and comfort. Interestingly, padded Waeco ice boxes were strapped into place under each seat allowing a further two anglers to stay up front enjoying both shelter from the elements and ease of conversation. On longer trips, both issues are quite important!

Massive side pockets in cockpit

What I noticed next was the 700mm deep cockpit with it’s teak flooring, plus a welcome plethora of features for the angling team, 4 of whom could fish with complete ease in that big half-of-craft cockpit. Without doubt, the prominent cockpit feature was the sheer volume of the 650S’s off floor side pockets, which extended from the transom forward to the rear of the cuddy cab. These were huge, providing plenty of room for tackle boxes, gaffs, tag poles and other large items as well as brace points for the feet under them. Each pocket also incorporated horizontal rod racks to keep rods readily accessible while under way.

At the rear of the starboard pocket, a battery isolator and other switches were within easy reach while a deck wash was snugged into the aft section of the port pocket.

Additional features included paired rod holders plus large grab rails atop gunwales as well as 1m long under floor storage compartments each side of the cockpit work area. At the full height transom, a fully plumbed clear fronted live bait tank sat to starboard, battery compartment central, with a locking boarding gate to port, boarding ladder directly aft. A moulded bait station featured a cutting board and tackle tray plus drink holders. Completing stern features were teak inlaid boarding platforms each side of the Suzuki 250.

Performance and Fishability

The 650 F’s Standard Variable Deadrise Hull – featuring a fine entry running back to a 21° ‘V’ section astern (and with some impressive under hull strakes in between) weighs in around 1250kg. The excellent design plus weight then combine to offer one of the best rides to be found in a modern fibreglass craft. There’s no denying the fact that this 7-person rated rig needs to be well powered. Accordingly, engine ratings are from 150-250hp, which saw the V6 250 Suzuki as top power.

Whisper quiet at idle, I noted that even at near full throttle the 3.6L V6 hardly intruded upon cockpit conversation. The rig planed at 14.2km/h at a mere 2500rpm, 3000rpm saw 25.6km/h, 4000rpm saw 48.6km/h, 5000rpm to 62.8km/h and 6000rpm got us flying along at 75.5km/h.

Fuel consumption figures were interesting. At planing speed the big Signature was using 13.5L/h. At a fast plane of 25.6km/h, (3000rpm) fuel consumption was modest 24.3L/h but what really impressed me was fuel consumption data at what I believe would be an ideal cruising speed in an offshore situation of around 40km/h: 28L/h at 3,500 rpm.

I found the big 21 footer was a pleasure to drive. It was so well balanced, so easily powered by the 250 Suzuki, in many respects I felt as though I was at the helm of a much smaller boat. My review was carried out in Moreton Bay on a fairly unfriendly sort of morning with plenty of northerly pushing through yet the big hull handled things with such ease, so gentle through the chop and with a complete lack of fuss, that it was fun to execute sharp turns just to see how rapidly the hull recovered to a level attitude. Throughout it all the hull’s interior remained dry, all that nasty salt water kept well away from us.

Fishing boats need to be stable and thanks to the considerable mass of the craft plus the time proven hull design, stability was so good that even 3 persons on one side could not upset the hull’s levelness at rest. This factor is important in the sorts of offshore fishing situations the 650 was designed for, as attested by the 370L fuel capacity.

Summing Up

Given the deluxe standard of finish, that brilliant ride linked to an impressive sea keeping ability plus angling features galore, I believe the Haines Signature 650F Hard Top is an exceptional fishing craft for the dedicated angler who is keen on all manner of bay or serious offshore work.

Common sense dictates that quality of this high standard does not come cheaply yet a basic package equipped with a 175hp Suzuki carried on a dual axle Dunbier trailer would come home for a quite reasonable $78,491, including registration and safety equipment. Note that Haines Signature hulls come with a 10-year structural warranty.

To ascertain details of a local Haines Signature dealer, the Haines Group can be contacted on wwwsignatureboats.com.au or phone (07) 3271 4400.

Technical Information.

Length6.50m
Beam 2.50m
Length on trailer approx. 7.60m
Height on trailer approx. 2.45m
Hull weight 1250kg
Deadrise 21.3°
Fuel 270L
Engine ratings 150-250hp
Engine fitted 250 Suzuki 4-stroke
Persons 7
Towing

Larger 4x4    

Haines Signature 650F - Bluewater Magazine BACK


The Haines Group’s Signature Variable Deadrise Hull, known as SVDH, may be small by bluewater standards, but it definitely packs a punch, and Warren Steptoe regards it as one of the best smallboat hull designs in the world today.

The Haines Group’s Signature Variable Deadrise Hull, known by its acronym SVDH, is without doubt one of the best small-boat hull designs in the world today. It’s certainly one of the most sophisticated. Designed by the late John Haines Snr, often referred to as ‘Hainesy’ by his friends, SVDH utilises a complex bottom shape that blends a fine deadrise angle at the bows, flaring back to a still fairly steep angle at the transom. The variable deadrise. Strakes and a flat section along the keel manage the transition from low speeds until the hull is cleanly planing very well indeed, with the chines shaped to maintain the at-rest stability so important while fishing.

down beside the hardtop, with super-bright LED deck lights each side of the rod rack. There are also three rodholders in the sidedecks either side of the cockpit, with a further three across the workbench perched atop the aft bulkhead. That’s 20 rods stowed so far and we haven’t even counted the other set of racks inside each sidepocket. These I imagine would also be used for gaffs, tag poles and boat hooks, as well as the more fragile outfits that you prefer to keep out of harm’s way. There are 20-metre boats that have less rod stowage than the 650F!

Inside the cuddy cabin there’s ample space for a couple to sleep in some comfort, with a portable toilet underneath the infill cushion. Waterborne crime being the problem it is these days, the securely lockable sliding cabin door is obviously a good idea. This is as applicable to the fishing side of this boat’s personality as for a family boating role.

HARDTOP COMFORT

On the other hand, something I can’t praise highly enough is the 650F’s hardtop. It creates a total comfort zone around the helm area, sheltered from the rain and spray in every direction except directly aft, and well ventilated in hot weather by opening the big sliding glass windows. In the helm area there are a pair of beautifully designed and very deep bucket seats that wrap around each side to keep occupants comfortable and in place during rough weather. Thanks to a big opening between their cushion and squab, they don’t create the sweatbox that deep bucket seats can often become. When you need to stand up, to cushion the ride or improve vision, the front section of the cushion flips up to brace your backside against. Another advantage is that the frames the seats are mounted on are easily height-adjustable via a simple pin system to get both the seat and the bracing bolster at the right height. This is the first time I’ve seen this type of feature and I can’t praise it highly enough. However, supplementary seating isn’t as well presented in this particular boat and is restricted to cushions on the lid of a pair of iceboxes fitted under the bucket seats. These can serve either as iceboxes or as dry stowage space and are easily accessible because the seat cushions flip up, so the whole lid doesn’t have to be opened to get inside. Further gear stowage is located beneath the bunks in the cuddy cab and in a roomy locker situated belowdecks between the helm and passenger seats. Out in the cockpit there’s a long, skinny fish locker belowdecks on each side. These are well shaped for the pelagic fish you might elect to take home for the table. the deck in the boat reviewed drains through strainers into a compartment where it can be pumped out, with the option for a fully self-draining deck available.

CUSTOM OPTIONS

Because this particular boat belongs to Greg Haines it has been fitted-out with some very upmarket options, which could add an extra $50,000 on top of the base boat/motor/ trailer price of $79,178. This investment includes laying Sea Deck in the cockpit. I’ve encountered this product several times now and it never fails to impress with a soft, non-slip surface underfoot, which wears well and looks fantastic. Among the options available for the 650F are three different transom arrangements. If you look closely you’ll find that the transom area is a modular moulding that can easily be changed for one option or another while the hull is being built. One option, as fitted to this boat, is a transom door portside with a pair of boarding platforms outside on the transom proper, and a livewell to starboard. The workbench seen in this boat slots into central mountings. A folding rear lounge is also available, although was not fitted to our test boat. Alternately, the second option incorporates a pair of livewells, one either side, with or without the workbench. These workbenches are considered a must among offshore reef anglers, although they do tend to get in the way when gamefishing. A third alternative offered for the 650F has no livebait tanks, a folding outboard flap and a transom door.

AN ARSENAL OF RODS

I never thought I’d hear myself say this, but rod stowage in the boat reviewed is almost over the top. The beautifully crafted stainless-steel Targa arch over the hardtop roof stows no less than 11 rods in two rows. A set of Reelax outriggers is mounted lower  down beside the hardtop, with super-bright LED deck lights each side of the rod rack. There are also three rodholders in the sidedecks either side of the cockpit, with a further three across the workbench perched atop the aft bulkhead. That’s 20 rods stowed so far and we haven’t even counted the other set of racks inside each sidepocket. These I imagine would also be used for gaffs, tag poles and boat hooks, as well as the more fragile outfits that you prefer to keep out of harm’s way. There are 20-metre boats that have less rod stowage than the 650F! Inside the cuddy cabin there’s ample space for a couple to sleep in some comfort, with a portable toilet underneath the infill cushion. Waterborne crime being the problem it is these days, the securely lockable sliding cabin door is obviously a good idea. This is as applicable to the fishing side of this boat’s personality as for a family boating role.

GARMIN SONAR

One feature of Greg’s boat you can’t help but notice is a monster 15-inch display screen that takes up the entire dash space. This is a Garmin GPS Map 8015MFD that’s clearly what you might call one hell of a sonar/ GPS unit for a small boat. It’s got more apps than a mobile phone, including in this case a GHP20 auto pilot, as well as a GCV 10 scanner module for both downward and side scanning. While the 8015 MFD is able to display an amazing array of information, to keep the screen clear for fish finding and navigation duties Greg’s boat is fitted with three Garmin GMI 20 display units for engine information, alongside a Fusion sound system and a Garmin VHF radio, all mounted in an overhead console incorporated into the hardtop. A 370-litre fuel tank completes one of the best boats this size I’ve ever reviewed for BlueWater magazine. This particular boat is probably a bit overoptioned, but that doesn’t change the fact that even at its basic fitout, the Signature 650F is a great pocket rocket, trailerable, bluewater sportfisher. With a towing weight around 2.2 to 2.5 tonnes depending on fuel load, it can also be towed by the 4WDs many readers will probably already own, although that’s just one of its many attractions.

HIGHLIGHTS

Signature’s brilliant SVDH hull.

Super-comfy helm and passenger seats.

Comfortable and sheltered helm area.

PERFORMANCE

Loaded with 95% fuel and two adults

RPM SPEED (km/h) FUEL (L/h)

650 4.1 0.4

1000 7.2 0.5

1500 10 0.7

2000 12 8.9

2500 14.2 13.5

3000 25 24.3

3500 40 28

4000 48.3 29

4500 55 37.5

5000 61 44.4

5500 66 62.2

6000 71.5 75.5 (wide-open throttle)

PRICE

Price as tested: Approximately $130,000

Priced from: $79,178

OPTIONS FITTED

Reelax outriggers, Garmin GPS Map 8015MFD, Garmin GHP20

auto pilot, Garmin GCV 10 scanner module, 3 x Garmin GMI 20

display units, custom rocket launcher, portable toilet, central bunk

infill, Sea Deck deck material, Garmin VHF 200i, Fusion MS-IP700i

stereo, transom workbench, custom seat frames with Signature

split-system iceboxes, dual HD windscreen wipers, power anchor

winch, pump-out for in-deck fishboxes, LED cockpit floodlights.

GENERAL

Material: GRP composites utilising proprietary ‘Nexus’ construction.

Hull type: proprietary ‘SVDH’ variable deadrise mono-hull.

Length: 6.5 metres

Beam: 2.5 metres

Deadrise: 33° (bow), 21° (transom)

Weight: 1250kg (hull only)

BMT towing weight: 2.2-2.5 tonnes (approx)

CAPACITIES

Maximum Rated Power: 250hp

Maximum Engine Weight: 270kg

People: 7

Fuel: 370 litres

ENGINE

Make/model: Suzuki DF250AP

Type: DOHC EFI V6

Rated power: 250hp/184kw

Displacement: 3.6 litres

No. Cylinders: 6

Weight: 270kg

Gearbox ratio: 2.29:1

TEST BOAT SUPPLIED BY

The Haines Group

Wacol, Queensland

www.signatureboats.com.au

Words By Warren Steptoe

Videos


Upholstery colours


Personalise your Siganture

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Hull colours [Gellcoat]


Trim colours


Personalise your Siganture

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours
650F

Optional Extras

Configurations

Specifications

Length 6.50m
Beam 2.50m
Deadrise 21−33"
Fuel 370L
Water 38L (option)
Berths 2
Power outboard 200HP V6 - 250HP
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 280kg
Hull weight approx. 1,250kg
Towing weight approx. 2,200kg
BMT length approx. 7.60m
BMT height approx. 2.45m
BMT width approx. 2.50m
Max people 7/630kg
Max load 900kg

Haines Signature 650F - Trade A Boat Magazine BACK

The Haines Signature 650F is the flagship of the Haines Group’s 18-model fishing boat fleet.

One of the latest additions to the Haines Group range of fishing boats is the Signature 650F. One of the brand’s largest fishing boats, it’s sure to impress anglers dedicated to offshore fishing and much more.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 650F

 

A first glance of the Haines Signature 650F revealed it is not your standard 6.5m boat, it looks far bigger than what it actually is. In fact it looks more like a 7m boat with its big shoulders flowing into the new hardtop, as well as a maximum beam of 2.5m standing out.

It’s on board where space has really been maximised to its full limit and again you get the feeling of being on a larger boat as the deck space is huge and uncluttered. As per normal the Signature gunwales are set up high and are comfortable and secure to lean against, with that height maintained right through to the transom, which I like.

The transom also comes in three configurations, namely: a single livewell with viewing window, transom door and storage; a dual livewell setup with storage; and a third with seating configuration and storage. I think it’s a great idea having the different options suited to both fishing and family boating.

 

LAYOUT

 

Among other notable features on the Haines Signature 650F are the sidepockets which are definitely wider than usual and actually protrude slightly out from the coaming line. It was evident that you can load them with more gear, use them as dedicated steps, plus you can mount larger rod racks without having the reels protruding into the deck. It also allows for thicker bolster pads to be run around the coaming edges while still being vertically uniform.

Next to note are two large under-sole fishbins with flush-mount deck hatches on either side of the keel line. They may not be ultra-deep but are long and could take decent-size mackerel without having to snap them in half, as well as both taking a good couple of kilos of other fish and ice without an issue. Both bins are plumbed for drainage.

Up front the new hardtop stands out; its large split windscreen and large side windows provide plenty of light and ventilation and there is space to mount a few accessories, while the stainless steel rear frame and launchers give the setup a nice, modern look.

The helm seats are mounted on adjustable frames that can house large Eskys within to serve as fishboxes, extra watertight storage and/or seating. Between the seats is another flush-mount hatch, so definitely no shortage when it comes to the storage options on this boat.

At the helm the dedicated captain’s dash is hinged to the bulkhead making for easy access in mounting steering and electronics. The dash angle is quite vertical and is a preference of mine rather than those you struggle to see electronics on when seated or standing at the stern. The captain’s seat also has a flip-up bolster and on either side of the seats are recessed sidepockets with stainless steel drinkholders, footrests and a lockable glove box on the passenger side.

The cabin has a lockable sliding door, full bunks, sidepockets, LED lighting, storage below the bunks, large top hatch for anchor access to the bow and even a portable toilet for those not prepared to go au naturel overboard.

 

HANDLING AND RIDE

 

When it’s time to head out for a day on the water there’s no doubt the Signature 650F is designed for long days and long distances, considering the 370lt fuel capacity. As tested this 650F was fitted with the maximum horsepower rating of 250, and a Suzuki 250 four-stroke to be precise.

 As the ‘whisperers’ of four-strokes it always amazes me at just how quiet these Suzuki motors are, even up in the large horsepower range.

On the throttle the Haines Signature 650F leaps onto the plane effortlessly, and that was even with four men aboard. From holeshot to WOT it’s a quick transition and with a bit of extra trimming a speed of 43.5kts can be achieved. That’s pretty quick on a boat of this size although, like with any outboard, you will chew up a bit of extra gas.

The balance of ride and performance included good stability at both rest and underway, as well as the hull tucking into turns nicely with a locked-in trim. Overall it was an easy and comfortable boat to drive considering the size.

 

THE VERDICT

 

Normally, Signature boats come with loads of extra features and accessories. Now don’t get me wrong, the Haines Signature 650F is still loaded with some really good features and accessories, enough to get on the water in quite a flashy boat. Interestingly, though, these have been kept a bit more on the simple side allowing Signature to produce one hell of a fishing boat and in my opinion, at one hell of a good price considering its size and what it has to offer.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 650F SEA TRIALS

Single 250hp Suzuki four-stroke outboard motor

RPM

SPEED (kts)

FUEL BURN (lt/h)

650

2.5

1.7

1000

4.2

3.5

1500

5.4

5.5

2000

6.7

9.3

2500

8.5

14.8

3000

3.2

20.5

3500

22.5

25.2

4000

26.7

29.7

4500

31.3

39

5000

35.8

51.9

5500

38.5

64.9

6000

43.5

83.6

* Sea-trial data supplied by the author.

 

HIGHS

• Bigger is better

• Maximum deck space

• Transom and gunwale setup

• Large flush-deck killtanks

• Large fuel capacity

• Price

 

LOWS

• Add trim tabs (personal preference, but it doesn’t have to have them)

• Prefer batteries raised off the deck

• Needs a slightly wider grabrail on rear of hardtop

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 650F SPECIFICATIONS

PRICE AS TESTED

Haines Signature 650F price: $102,977

 

OPTIONS FITTED

Sliding cabin door with lock, hardtop and accessories, stainless steel ladder, recessed cockapit lighting, livebait tank, deckwash, transom door and lounge, VHF radio, Signature pattern gelcoat, lighting strips, Suzuki DF250TX outboard motor, stainless steel prop, Garmin electronics, fuel filter, and Dunbier trailer

 

PRICED FROM

$75,885 (BMT)

 

GENERAL

MATERIAL Fibreglass

TYPE Planing monohull

LENGTH 6.5m    

BEAM 2.5m

WEIGHT 1250kg

DEADRISE 21 to 33°

 

CAPACITIES

PEOPLE (DAY) 7

PEOPLE (NIGHT) 2           

REC. HP 175       

REC. MAX HP 250            

FUEL 370lt          

WATER 40lt (optional)

 

ENGINE

MAKE/MODEL Suzuki DF250TX outboard motor

TYPE V6 four-stroke petrol outboard motor

RATED HP 250

DISPLACEMENT 3.614cm³

WEIGHT 263kg  

GEAR RATIO 2.29:1

 

SUPPLIED BY

Australian Marine Centre

3491 Pacific Highway,

Slacks Creek, QLD, 4127

Phone (07) 3808 7333

Web amcboats.com.au

 

Words By Kevin Smith

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/1502/haines-signature-650f-review/

Haines Signature 650F - Fishing Monthly Magazine BACK

Words By Wayne Kempe

Review supplied by Fishing Monthly Magazine

http://www.fishingmonthly.com.au/Articles/Display/17929-Haines-Signature-650F-Hard-Top


As the largest of the Haines Signature F series craft, the 650F Hard Top is regarded by many fishing and boating enthusiasts as arguably the ultimate trailerable fishing boat.

The point is that this craft just has so much going for it, from the beautifully proportioned lines of the sleek fibreglass hull, neat cuddy cab and high cockpit sides, all linked to enough standard fishing features to satisfy any angler wanting to have the lot at the finger tips. And there are a lot of options! In the reviewed craft alone they stretched from outrigger poles to an auto pilot, massive Garmin unit and other goodies. And let’s not overlook the ride from the variable deadrise hull. In all, the ride was very enjoyable whether just cruising or really punching along.

The 650F offers several transom options for the buyer; the reviewed craft being equipped with a full size engine well, clear sided recirculating live well plus a locking transom door.

Power anchor winch the way to go

The reviewed 650F was anchor winch equipped. I feel that most owners would opt for a power winch in lieu of accessing the anchor hatch via the cabin’s front hatch. It’s possible to go forward to the front of the 650’s cabin making use of various hard top hand holds (which I did on the beach) but I could not see this being viable at sea. When leaving the craft from the front, the large bow rail offered excellent security.

Within the 650 F’s cabin, I noted ample headroom, soft lining, overhead pockets plus plenty of light from windows. Excellent cushions would allow a couple to sleep in comfort and there were generously large storage lockers under the 2m+ bunks. Entry was via a locking sliding door.

Note that an under floor compartment was located just outside the cabin door and would be handy for the skipper and first mate’s tucker or cold drinks.

With a fully enclosed hardtop on a stainless steel frame the 650F’s helm area and forward seating were thoroughly weather protected thanks to the shelter provided by the hard top and wiper equipped curved windscreen up front, paired sliding side windows. Note that cockpit lights were set into the rear of the targa framework with some 7 rod holders up top.

Dual instrument area

The craft’s full width moulded dash area incorporated a locking glove box with a grab handle under it for the first mate; a side pocket with drink holder at the elbow. The 650F’s main dash area was a split system in that Garmin GMI 20 gauges monitoring the Suzuki 250 were set up above the windscreen, within the hard top’s return, along with a VHF marine radio and compass. In this location it would only take a glance upwards for the skipper to keep in touch.

Directly ahead of the helm seating was a very neat moulded binnacle with a padded lip providing shade over the craft’s (optional) Garmin GPS Map 8015 unit. The craft’s 3-spoke wheel was directly below with banks of rocker switches set each side, as well as under, the wheel. Controls for the craft’s GHP auto pilot (another option) were prominent while the Suzuki 250’s forward controls, featuring Suzuki’s ultra smooth Precision Control System, were side mounted along with an ignition key plus other controls, among them being trim tab activators.

In all it was a very neat dash layout, definitely highlighted by the fact that the moulded binnacle could be unlocked from the adjacent moulding and tilted back to allow access to the extremely neat wiring tucked behind it. Without doubt this was one of the best set ups I’ve seen; a marine mechanic’s dream come true.

Forward seating was of deluxe standard with slide adjustable bolster fronted buckets (featuring double stitched upholstery) mounted on rigid stainless frames and affording both skipper and first mate highest levels of visibility and comfort. Interestingly, padded Waeco ice boxes were strapped into place under each seat allowing a further two anglers to stay up front enjoying both shelter from the elements and ease of conversation. On longer trips, both issues are quite important!

Massive side pockets in cockpit

What I noticed next was the 700mm deep cockpit with it’s teak flooring, plus a welcome plethora of features for the angling team, 4 of whom could fish with complete ease in that big half-of-craft cockpit. Without doubt, the prominent cockpit feature was the sheer volume of the 650S’s off floor side pockets, which extended from the transom forward to the rear of the cuddy cab. These were huge, providing plenty of room for tackle boxes, gaffs, tag poles and other large items as well as brace points for the feet under them. Each pocket also incorporated horizontal rod racks to keep rods readily accessible while under way.

At the rear of the starboard pocket, a battery isolator and other switches were within easy reach while a deck wash was snugged into the aft section of the port pocket.

Additional features included paired rod holders plus large grab rails atop gunwales as well as 1m long under floor storage compartments each side of the cockpit work area. At the full height transom, a fully plumbed clear fronted live bait tank sat to starboard, battery compartment central, with a locking boarding gate to port, boarding ladder directly aft. A moulded bait station featured a cutting board and tackle tray plus drink holders. Completing stern features were teak inlaid boarding platforms each side of the Suzuki 250.

Performance and Fishability

The 650 F’s Standard Variable Deadrise Hull – featuring a fine entry running back to a 21° ‘V’ section astern (and with some impressive under hull strakes in between) weighs in around 1250kg. The excellent design plus weight then combine to offer one of the best rides to be found in a modern fibreglass craft. There’s no denying the fact that this 7-person rated rig needs to be well powered. Accordingly, engine ratings are from 150-250hp, which saw the V6 250 Suzuki as top power.

Whisper quiet at idle, I noted that even at near full throttle the 3.6L V6 hardly intruded upon cockpit conversation. The rig planed at 14.2km/h at a mere 2500rpm, 3000rpm saw 25.6km/h, 4000rpm saw 48.6km/h, 5000rpm to 62.8km/h and 6000rpm got us flying along at 75.5km/h.

Fuel consumption figures were interesting. At planing speed the big Signature was using 13.5L/h. At a fast plane of 25.6km/h, (3000rpm) fuel consumption was modest 24.3L/h but what really impressed me was fuel consumption data at what I believe would be an ideal cruising speed in an offshore situation of around 40km/h: 28L/h at 3,500 rpm.

I found the big 21 footer was a pleasure to drive. It was so well balanced, so easily powered by the 250 Suzuki, in many respects I felt as though I was at the helm of a much smaller boat. My review was carried out in Moreton Bay on a fairly unfriendly sort of morning with plenty of northerly pushing through yet the big hull handled things with such ease, so gentle through the chop and with a complete lack of fuss, that it was fun to execute sharp turns just to see how rapidly the hull recovered to a level attitude. Throughout it all the hull’s interior remained dry, all that nasty salt water kept well away from us.

Fishing boats need to be stable and thanks to the considerable mass of the craft plus the time proven hull design, stability was so good that even 3 persons on one side could not upset the hull’s levelness at rest. This factor is important in the sorts of offshore fishing situations the 650 was designed for, as attested by the 370L fuel capacity.

Summing Up

Given the deluxe standard of finish, that brilliant ride linked to an impressive sea keeping ability plus angling features galore, I believe the Haines Signature 650F Hard Top is an exceptional fishing craft for the dedicated angler who is keen on all manner of bay or serious offshore work.

Common sense dictates that quality of this high standard does not come cheaply yet a basic package equipped with a 175hp Suzuki carried on a dual axle Dunbier trailer would come home for a quite reasonable $78,491, including registration and safety equipment. Note that Haines Signature hulls come with a 10-year structural warranty.

To ascertain details of a local Haines Signature dealer, the Haines Group can be contacted on wwwsignatureboats.com.au or phone (07) 3271 4400.

Technical Information.

Length6.50m
Beam 2.50m
Length on trailer approx. 7.60m
Height on trailer approx. 2.45m
Hull weight 1250kg
Deadrise 21.3°
Fuel 270L
Engine ratings 150-250hp
Engine fitted 250 Suzuki 4-stroke
Persons 7
Towing

Larger 4x4    

Haines Signature 650F - Bluewater Magazine BACK

The Haines Group’s Signature Variable Deadrise Hull, known as SVDH, may be small by bluewater standards, but it definitely packs a punch, and Warren Steptoe regards it as one of the best smallboat hull designs in the world today.

The Haines Group’s Signature Variable Deadrise Hull, known by its acronym SVDH, is without doubt one of the best small-boat hull designs in the world today. It’s certainly one of the most sophisticated. Designed by the late John Haines Snr, often referred to as ‘Hainesy’ by his friends, SVDH utilises a complex bottom shape that blends a fine deadrise angle at the bows, flaring back to a still fairly steep angle at the transom. The variable deadrise. Strakes and a flat section along the keel manage the transition from low speeds until the hull is cleanly planing very well indeed, with the chines shaped to maintain the at-rest stability so important while fishing.

down beside the hardtop, with super-bright LED deck lights each side of the rod rack. There are also three rodholders in the sidedecks either side of the cockpit, with a further three across the workbench perched atop the aft bulkhead. That’s 20 rods stowed so far and we haven’t even counted the other set of racks inside each sidepocket. These I imagine would also be used for gaffs, tag poles and boat hooks, as well as the more fragile outfits that you prefer to keep out of harm’s way. There are 20-metre boats that have less rod stowage than the 650F!

Inside the cuddy cabin there’s ample space for a couple to sleep in some comfort, with a portable toilet underneath the infill cushion. Waterborne crime being the problem it is these days, the securely lockable sliding cabin door is obviously a good idea. This is as applicable to the fishing side of this boat’s personality as for a family boating role.

HARDTOP COMFORT

On the other hand, something I can’t praise highly enough is the 650F’s hardtop. It creates a total comfort zone around the helm area, sheltered from the rain and spray in every direction except directly aft, and well ventilated in hot weather by opening the big sliding glass windows. In the helm area there are a pair of beautifully designed and very deep bucket seats that wrap around each side to keep occupants comfortable and in place during rough weather. Thanks to a big opening between their cushion and squab, they don’t create the sweatbox that deep bucket seats can often become. When you need to stand up, to cushion the ride or improve vision, the front section of the cushion flips up to brace your backside against. Another advantage is that the frames the seats are mounted on are easily height-adjustable via a simple pin system to get both the seat and the bracing bolster at the right height. This is the first time I’ve seen this type of feature and I can’t praise it highly enough. However, supplementary seating isn’t as well presented in this particular boat and is restricted to cushions on the lid of a pair of iceboxes fitted under the bucket seats. These can serve either as iceboxes or as dry stowage space and are easily accessible because the seat cushions flip up, so the whole lid doesn’t have to be opened to get inside. Further gear stowage is located beneath the bunks in the cuddy cab and in a roomy locker situated belowdecks between the helm and passenger seats. Out in the cockpit there’s a long, skinny fish locker belowdecks on each side. These are well shaped for the pelagic fish you might elect to take home for the table. the deck in the boat reviewed drains through strainers into a compartment where it can be pumped out, with the option for a fully self-draining deck available.

CUSTOM OPTIONS

Because this particular boat belongs to Greg Haines it has been fitted-out with some very upmarket options, which could add an extra $50,000 on top of the base boat/motor/ trailer price of $79,178. This investment includes laying Sea Deck in the cockpit. I’ve encountered this product several times now and it never fails to impress with a soft, non-slip surface underfoot, which wears well and looks fantastic. Among the options available for the 650F are three different transom arrangements. If you look closely you’ll find that the transom area is a modular moulding that can easily be changed for one option or another while the hull is being built. One option, as fitted to this boat, is a transom door portside with a pair of boarding platforms outside on the transom proper, and a livewell to starboard. The workbench seen in this boat slots into central mountings. A folding rear lounge is also available, although was not fitted to our test boat. Alternately, the second option incorporates a pair of livewells, one either side, with or without the workbench. These workbenches are considered a must among offshore reef anglers, although they do tend to get in the way when gamefishing. A third alternative offered for the 650F has no livebait tanks, a folding outboard flap and a transom door.

AN ARSENAL OF RODS

I never thought I’d hear myself say this, but rod stowage in the boat reviewed is almost over the top. The beautifully crafted stainless-steel Targa arch over the hardtop roof stows no less than 11 rods in two rows. A set of Reelax outriggers is mounted lower  down beside the hardtop, with super-bright LED deck lights each side of the rod rack. There are also three rodholders in the sidedecks either side of the cockpit, with a further three across the workbench perched atop the aft bulkhead. That’s 20 rods stowed so far and we haven’t even counted the other set of racks inside each sidepocket. These I imagine would also be used for gaffs, tag poles and boat hooks, as well as the more fragile outfits that you prefer to keep out of harm’s way. There are 20-metre boats that have less rod stowage than the 650F! Inside the cuddy cabin there’s ample space for a couple to sleep in some comfort, with a portable toilet underneath the infill cushion. Waterborne crime being the problem it is these days, the securely lockable sliding cabin door is obviously a good idea. This is as applicable to the fishing side of this boat’s personality as for a family boating role.

GARMIN SONAR

One feature of Greg’s boat you can’t help but notice is a monster 15-inch display screen that takes up the entire dash space. This is a Garmin GPS Map 8015MFD that’s clearly what you might call one hell of a sonar/ GPS unit for a small boat. It’s got more apps than a mobile phone, including in this case a GHP20 auto pilot, as well as a GCV 10 scanner module for both downward and side scanning. While the 8015 MFD is able to display an amazing array of information, to keep the screen clear for fish finding and navigation duties Greg’s boat is fitted with three Garmin GMI 20 display units for engine information, alongside a Fusion sound system and a Garmin VHF radio, all mounted in an overhead console incorporated into the hardtop. A 370-litre fuel tank completes one of the best boats this size I’ve ever reviewed for BlueWater magazine. This particular boat is probably a bit overoptioned, but that doesn’t change the fact that even at its basic fitout, the Signature 650F is a great pocket rocket, trailerable, bluewater sportfisher. With a towing weight around 2.2 to 2.5 tonnes depending on fuel load, it can also be towed by the 4WDs many readers will probably already own, although that’s just one of its many attractions.

HIGHLIGHTS

Signature’s brilliant SVDH hull.

Super-comfy helm and passenger seats.

Comfortable and sheltered helm area.

PERFORMANCE

Loaded with 95% fuel and two adults

RPM SPEED (km/h) FUEL (L/h)

650 4.1 0.4

1000 7.2 0.5

1500 10 0.7

2000 12 8.9

2500 14.2 13.5

3000 25 24.3

3500 40 28

4000 48.3 29

4500 55 37.5

5000 61 44.4

5500 66 62.2

6000 71.5 75.5 (wide-open throttle)

PRICE

Price as tested: Approximately $130,000

Priced from: $79,178

OPTIONS FITTED

Reelax outriggers, Garmin GPS Map 8015MFD, Garmin GHP20

auto pilot, Garmin GCV 10 scanner module, 3 x Garmin GMI 20

display units, custom rocket launcher, portable toilet, central bunk

infill, Sea Deck deck material, Garmin VHF 200i, Fusion MS-IP700i

stereo, transom workbench, custom seat frames with Signature

split-system iceboxes, dual HD windscreen wipers, power anchor

winch, pump-out for in-deck fishboxes, LED cockpit floodlights.

GENERAL

Material: GRP composites utilising proprietary ‘Nexus’ construction.

Hull type: proprietary ‘SVDH’ variable deadrise mono-hull.

Length: 6.5 metres

Beam: 2.5 metres

Deadrise: 33° (bow), 21° (transom)

Weight: 1250kg (hull only)

BMT towing weight: 2.2-2.5 tonnes (approx)

CAPACITIES

Maximum Rated Power: 250hp

Maximum Engine Weight: 270kg

People: 7

Fuel: 370 litres

ENGINE

Make/model: Suzuki DF250AP

Type: DOHC EFI V6

Rated power: 250hp/184kw

Displacement: 3.6 litres

No. Cylinders: 6

Weight: 270kg

Gearbox ratio: 2.29:1

TEST BOAT SUPPLIED BY

The Haines Group

Wacol, Queensland

www.signatureboats.com.au

Words By Warren Steptoe

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