485SF
  • Built for experienced fishermen that know what they want
  • Big open layout
  • Lots of storage
  • Large live wells: bait tank at back, live one at front and kill well in floor
  • Built for tournament fishing
  • Fuel efficiency – 120L fuel massive range (suitable for remote dams)
  • Punches outside of its weight category
  • Handles choppy water with complete confidence
  • Fully customisable with all options

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Length 4.85m
Beam 2.05m
Deadrise 21–33°
Fuel 120L option
Water N/A
Berths N/A
Power outboard Options: 40-60HP with tiller configuration | 40-70HP with tiller configuration and outboard well fitted | 40-90HP with console configuration, remote steering and outboard well fitted
Transom height 20"
Max outboard weight 170kg
Hull weight approx. 320kg
Towing weight approx. 935kg (console)
BMT length approx. 6.4m (console)
BMT height approx. 1.75m
BMT width approx. 2.04m
Max people 5/450kg
Max load Options: 400kg with tiller | 400kg with tiller config and outboard well | 615kg with console config and outboard well fitted

Haines Signature 485SF - Trade A Boat Magazine BACK


"The Haines Signature 485SF is without doubt the driest, softest riding, most forgiving and safest handling hull its size I’ve ever tested," says Warren Steptoe. So yeah, he likes it.

 
HAINES SIGNATURE 485SF

 

TEST: HAINES SIGNATURE 485SF

To begin with I must confess a personal involvement in this boat, so if my objectiveness as a boat tester is questioned because of that, there's not much I can do about it. You see, my own boat is a prototype of what in the end became one of the most revolutionary boats ever to come from the Haines Group, builders of Haines Signature and Haines Traveller boats,
and distributors of Suzuki outboards.

The story is worth relating because where the Haines Signature 485SF came from has much to do with where it's at - and why I'm so unashamedly enthusiastic about it. Some time back I tested a neat little Haines Traveller dinghy, designation TD149, and came away mightily impressed. What blew me away was how much better the hull's roughwater ride and general handling capabilities were compared to the multitude of tinnies you see on the water. The TD149's 4.5m hull did everything your average tinnie could do - only it did it much, much better. Even so, as a fishing boat it wasn't perfect and its interior layout left much to be desired.

I later expressed these thoughts to Greg Haines over a coffee on the deck of his Gold Coast canal-side home. Typically, Greg mulled over my words before asking me if I'd consider getting involved in a project to build a better fishing boat based on the TD149 hull. It was from this conversation that a hand-built prototype finally evolved.

 

 

EARLY DEVELOPMENT

The new model was a simple tiller-steered configuration, with wide overhanging sidedecks hiding a rodrack along each side, and casting decks bow and stern. We fitted a huge icebox across the aft end of the bow-deck and a pair of pedestal seats, and then powered the rig with a 50hp Suzuki four-stroke outboard on the stern and a 55lb thrust Minn Kota Riptide electric on the bows. Then I was sent off fishing to see how well we'd done with weight distribution, relative to the general configuration and allocation of interior space.

To trim the story before I start boasting about 125cm barramundi and 95cm flathead, I was so happy with the design that I eventually bought it and I'm still happily fishing from it years later.

So it was from there that the concept Greg and I came up with went into the Haines Group thinktank, and after a couple more prototypes the boat you see here finally emerged for testing.

Due to marketing considerations related to safety regulations in some States, it had grown to 4.85m, with some tweaking of the underwater shape along the way. The side-console is an option that had always been on the drawingboard, while the original basic configuration of casting decks, icebox and so on remained unchanged. The only change was some interior space gained from the extra length.

Even so, you'd never call the 485SF's interior radical so much as simple common sense, at least for those who fish anything from trout to bream and flathead to barra. Can I say "common sense" basically designed it? What else could I say?

Actually, the 485's hull and deck-moulds are revolutionary. Or industry-leading would be a better way to put it…

 

 

INDUSTRY LEADER

While the model was in development the Haines Group had for some time also been working on a new resin transfer technology. It was named "RIVALE" which stood for the acronym "Resin Injected Vacuum Assisted Low Emission". The RIVALE method pressure-injects resin into a mould comprising male and female halves, whereas traditional fibreglass (more correctly known as GRP, or glass reinforced plastic) is laid up inside a female mould. With RIVALE you end up with a significantly thinner, much stronger, and yet substantially lighter moulding with a smooth finish on both sides, rather than traditional GRP's rough interior. Material waste and environmental emissions are both dramatically reduced as are production costs.

Haines Group Production Manager John Haines (Jnr) told me that the labour component in building a 485SF hull averages 14 man hours where it took around 50 man hours to build its predecessors. So while RIVALE is more expensive to set up initially, once set up it's a total win situation.

 

 

FINAL TOUCHES

Only one major change from "my" prototype was evident in the finished 485SF, and that was separate hull and deck-moulds with foam-filling between. Bonding everything into a singular unit is another proprietary technology the Haines Group calls "Nexus". This technology gives the 485SF's hull formidable structural integrity and of course it must float so inherent safety aspects aren't to be understated either.

Earlier versions of similar technologies were developed overseas of course, but RIVALE was new in this country. Thus my "industry-leading" comment.

At the time of writing this boat test, it's been some months since my first experience with the 485SF and I've subsequently spent a lot more time in three different versions, with a fourth imminent during final judging for TrailerBoat's Australia's Greatest Boats Awards (AGB). I mention this because two of the 485 SFs I've tested were powered by 70hp Suzukis - one with a 60 and one coming up for AGB with a 90.

Both 70hp-powered boats proved nothing short of brilliant. The 485SF is without hesitation or doubt the driest, softest riding, most forgiving and safest handling hull its size I've ever tested. And I mean tested. Boat tests usually mean a few hours out on the water, and boating being boating (and testers have a few tricks they like to pull on test boats) means you experience conditions on the day as they come and then comment accordingly.

My experiences in the 485SF go way, way beyond that. Responsible boatbuilders like the Haines Group acknowledge that some (usually inexperienced) owners will get themselves into sketchy situations. There's only one way to find out what's going to happen when some ratbag pushes a boat past sane limits, and that's for the testing processes to step beyond sane limits to see what happens.

Suffice to say I've been there and done that and you, the reader, might note how confidently I used the words "most forgiving and safest handling" a moment ago.

The boat powered by a 60 belongs to my mate Scott Mitchell, who chose a 60 because of regulations on a dam he fishes. Scotto's boat is also equipped with all the bells and whistles you can imagine, so it's hardly a lightweight. Its performance with the 60 proved of bit of a disappointment after the two lighter boats with 70s.

Perhaps this is to be expected, because with more weight and less horsepower it's going to lack something. However, keeping in mind that the hull is rated up to 90hp, there's a clear message to potential 485SF owners that, unless they face similar restrictions to Scott, 70hp is a near perfect match for the 485SF hull.

As for 90hp, given how much sheer fun this hull is to throw around with a 70 on the back (and that it performs well enough to tow wake toys with a 70) a 90 should be exhilarating. Who's looking forward to testing for the Australia's Greatest Boats Award? Me? Hell yeah!

 

 

BELLS AND WHISTLES

Coming back to earth at this point, it has to be said that the boats seen in our pics, and certainly Scott Mitchell's (the bells and whistles version) are fully optioned. Part of the RIVALE concept with the 485SF hull is to allow various configurations, starting with a basic thwart-seat layout without a deck-moulding. The base model 485SF package comes in at just over fifteen grand including a 30hp two-stroke Suzuki and trailer.

From there the price climbs after the deck-moulding is added. It incorporates the liner for the big icebox, which can be plumbed as a livewell. There's also an underdeck fishpit which, due to the foam-filling would serve very well as an icebox. Plumbing for a livewell centrally located in the aft casting deck converts it from dry stowage.

More stowage is available in separate lockers each side of the aft casting deck as well as in another locker situated forward of the icebox in the bow casting deck. An anchorwell is set into a short foredeck, while a side-console is the final option.

One option I hadn't seen until stepping aboard Scott's boat (owing to the fact that it was still under development when initial testing occurred) was a rodlocker incorporated into the boat's interior (deck) moulding along the port side.

 

 

SMALL COMPROMISE

If you look at our pics you'll see vertical rodracks holding eight rods. These worked well enough I suppose but to my mind expensive rods are best stowed horizontally where a wayward cast can't snatch one. Rodracks under the sidedecks along each side of my prototype boat were central to its design, so my thoughts about this are clear enough. Having said that, RIVALE's unitised hull construction has enough quantifiable advantages in so many other ways for some compromise to become necessary - and the rodlocker's it unfortunately.

I also noted that to open the locker hatch in Scott's boat you had to lift the passenger seat out of its deck-socket first. It's an inconvenience which only increased my disappointment in the rodlocker. As for negative thoughts on the 485SF, that rodlocker's as bad as it gets!

Since its interior embodies what I feel a fishing boat its size should be, any comment about how good the 485SF is to fish from would be a tad biased. We actually towed a model with an inflatable doughnut for one of the photo shoots I was involved in with the 485SF, and while that's not so much my thing as fishing, the exercise did show how well this boat performed as a tow vehicle.

Swinging a 19in pitch, three-blade aluminium Suzuki propeller, the hull was planing cleanly in just over three seconds, reaching a top speed with a brand new and still "factory stiff" 70 Suzuki of 35kts on the dot. And there's probably a little more to come there as the motor beds in and frees up.

 

 

On the plane...

Super fishing friendly layout

The best hull in this size on the water

More dry stowage than you'd expect in an open fishing boat

 

 

Dragging the chain...


Rodlocker maybe a little disappointing

 



Specifications: Haines Signature 485SF

 

 

 

 

GENERAL

Type: Side-console sportfishing boat

Material: RIVALE moulded GRP composites

Length: 4.85 m

Beam: 2.05m

Deadrise: 21°

Hull weight: 320kg plus options

BMT trailering weight: 750kg+

 

 

CAPACITIES

Fuel: 130lt

People: 5

Min HP: 30 (basic version)

Max HP: 90

 

 

ENGINE

Make/model: Suzuki DF70

Type: Four-cylinder inline DOHC EFI four-stroke

Rated HP: 70

Displacement: 1502cc

Weight: 160kg

Gearbox Ratio: 2.59:1

Test propeller: 19in pitch Suzuki aluminium

 

 

MANUFACTURED & SUPPLIED BY

The Haines Group

140 Viking Drv

Wacol, Qld, 4076

Web: www.thehainesgroup.com

 

Words by Warren Steptoe

Originally published in TrailerBoat 259

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/tradeaboat-reviews/boats/1008/haines-signature-485sf-%282010%29-review/

 

Haines Signature 485SF - Trade Boats BACK


The Signature 485SF is a new class of fibreglass fisher from The Haines Group and a low-cost alternative to some high-priced bass boats, notes Rick Huckstepp

 

POCKET DYNAMO
A smart little number from the Haines Group has been floated on our waters in the form of the 485SF. For a small boat, this rig has amazing performance and versatility, and we had a good time putting it through its paces down at the Gold Coast recently.
The finish on this boat is as good as it gets in fibreglass, due to the use of  RIVALE technology, a technique which eventually will be more commonly used in this country, if not compulsory, due to its environmental friendliness during fibreglass product construction.
The process is one where two moulds are put together with the required amount of special matt cloth inserted between and the void between is vacuumed while resin is pumped in. This removes the issue of wet resin vapour flying though the air, but also ensures that there are no air pockets anywhere in the finished product.
The resulting products are strong with less chance of air pockets, material usages are more easily controlled and the finish is first class ? you can see this throughout the Signature 485SF. How strong? Well if you had been to any of the capital city boat shows last year you would have seen one of these hulls upside down on the floor with a 4WD parked on top of it - that strong!
We found the test boat, chock a block full of stowage and it is here that you realise the advantages of this relatively new technique.
Hatches are heavier but thinner and stronger than those featuring timber cores seen in the past and the finish is smooth on both sides due to the fact there is no manual spraying with chopper guns or hand rolling resin into the matt.
At the bow there is a hatch that will take a large Danforth or small grappling anchor. It seemed a shame that such a beautiful finish inside here would get knocked around by the ground tackle but a carpet lining might lessen the guilt.
Stepping down onto the forward casting deck there is another hatch that features a seat post base inserted in it. This is an option we would go for as there are no bowrails on the forequarters and a high bumseat is just the thing for stability when standing up in choppy water. Under that hatch is the cranking battery.
This boat may have an optional electric motor mount and a larger battery could be fitted into this compartment. We guess a 130amp/h battery running lengthways along the centreline would be a good supply to a 12V unit, although you would have to source another compartment to install the crank battery. Perhaps in the console would be ideal?
The most aft hatch in the forward casting deck is wide and makes an ideal killtank or icebox as do all of the other underdeck compartments in the 485SF due to the build and assembly of this craft.

 

NEXUS BUILD
The Haines Group utilise the same build on the 600RS, 675 and 600 bowrider hulls which they call Nexus, a system whereby the bottom hull is formed and the top liner is lowered inside.
The bottoms of the compartments of the top liner contact the inside of the hull where it is glued with methyl methacrylate. The voids throughout the boat are then pumped with foam to add further strength and sound proofing not to mention offering a boost to buoyancy.
The rolled inner edges of the side coamings on the base hull are further strengthened with the optional installation of an inner moulded coaming to square off the length of the cockpit. The internals of these coamings are then filled with long noodles of foam, the same as those kids play with in swimming pools. This allows the electrical wiring and other cabling to be passed through the void, among the noodles, while giving this boat positive buoyancy.
Another icebox is situated on the cockpit deck up against the forward casting platform bulkhead and a textured surface deck runs aft to the short casting platform that is loaded with hatches holding safety and other gear.
At the helm, a small wind deflector sits atop a well laid out console. It is small but big enough to do the job, housing a Furuno 7000F combination unit on a gimbal (borrowed for the test) while the Suzuki instrumentation is recessed. The compartment under this console is small but you would get a standard 70amp/h crank battery there if need be.
The swivel seating is removable can be shifted to even out the weight distribution if need be.

 

BIG PERFORMANCE
Put to the test, this boat is surprising for its size. We took it out through the Seaway and five kilometres off the coast. Although there was only a small swell running, there was plenty of chop to run over.
Noticeable was the lack of flexing in the hull and the soft quiet ride. We only got the hull to bang once and that is when we went across the wake of a 47-foot Riviera at full noise running north along the Broadwater. Other than that, this boat is gentle on the bones to say the least and quiet while it is at it.
Fitted with manual cable steering it displayed the typical torque at the helm when trimmed fully in ? and it had to be fully in for hard fast cornering.
Trimmed out, this boat is a little rocket and keeps a bow-down attitude most of the time, so it likes plenty of trim out which does not affect its direct steering.
Also noticeable was the dry ride. We had a wind of about 10 to 15kmh from the southeast and with the wind pushing over various quarters there was no need to dry the sunnies. This was due in part to the aggressive overhang of the coamings to the outside of the hull which downturned any water creeping up the side of the hull.
When one was seated and holding onto the sides you could feel the water contacting the hand, but deflected down and away. What was missing for the seated passenger was a handrail on that coaming.
 You may get this boat in a tiller-control 70hp version and also as a bare shell without the casting decks and console or inner gunwale add-ons. A maximum horsepower of 90 may be fitted to the 485SF but only with a helm wheel operation. As tested, with the latest model DF70 Suzuki four-stroke, this boat is a nicely balanced package offering good holeshot capability with two large adults aboard.
The engine hummed along at its comfortable cruise speed of 45kmh while running at 4250rpm and at WOT of 5600 it reached a speed of 62kmh and quietly so.
With an engine operating range of 5000 to 6000rpm there is room to move should you wish to prop this outfit to suit your style of boating. And no matter what that style would be, you will be doing it in style with the 485SF. This is a very tidy rig from The Haines Group.

 

WHAT WE LIKED
A low-profile boat that creates less wind drift
This could be a cheap alternative to an expensive bass style boat Quiet, dry and soft ride

 

NOT SO MUCH
We tried hard to find fault with this rig but didn't other than the lack of a handrail for the passenger seated next to the skipper

 

 

Specifications: Haines Signature 485SF

GENERAL
Material:    Fibreglass
Construction: RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission)
Length: 4.85m
Beam: 2.05m
Weight: 320kg (bare shell hull)

CAPACITIES
Fuel: 130lt
People: 5
Rec. max. HP: 90
Rec. min. HP: 30 (bare shell hull)
Rec. max. engine weight: 155kg

ENGINE
Make/model: Suzuki DF70
Type: Four-cylinder four-stroke
Rated HP: 70
Displacement: 1502cc
Weight: 155kg 
Gearbox ratio: 2.59:1
Propeller: 19-inch
VELS rating: 3-star

SUPPLIED BY
Springwood Marine,
3445 Pacific Highway,
Springwood, Qld, 4127

 

Words by Rick Huckstepp

Originally published in TrailerBoat #240

http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/0907/haines-signature-485sf-review/

Haines Signature 485SF - NAFA Review BACK


Still something special after five years, we revisit a standout fibreglass Top Ender-style boat that begs the question: why would anyone bother importing a US bass boat?

This boat and I have some history. It all began when I tested its ancestor, a Haines Traveller TD149 dinghy and history records that I liked a prototype for a new model based on it so much I bought it! Getting on for 7 years later, that boat remains my soul mate and that’s ‘nuff said about a now timeworn story...

From “my” prototype, the Haines Group worked away for the best part of 2 years while I was in and out of progressively updated versions culminating, when I was a judge at a “boat of the year” type event, in what’s now called the Signature 485SF. It should have won, and would have, if certain fellow judges ever travelled north far enough to see what goes on in the real world...

Which brings us to 2012 and the Haines Group asking me to revisit the Signature 485SF with the wisdom of hindsight.

Before getting onto that though, a quick refresher about the 485SF is in order. The 485SF is built with a new production process the Haines Group developed called “Rivale”. Essentially, instead of traditional application of resin to mat, laid up inside a female mould, Rivale injects tightly-controlled amounts of resin into a two-piece mould already containing fibreglass matting.

Because quality and quantities are so precisely controlled, a boat built with Rivale is at the same time thinner, lighter and considerably stronger. The process is also environmentally friendly due to control of emissions inside the enclosed mould.

The 485SF’s interior (deck) and hull mouldings are then bonded together with another Haines Group process it calls “Nexus” — space between the deck and outer hull is foam filled to create a singular unit of formidable structural integrity.

How successful the 485SF’s been is no surprise to me. I’ve tested about 5 different ones, and fished from a couple a fair bit. Friends of mine have bought them, and are as similarly besotted as I am with the prototype, including my mate Scott Mitchell (widely known as “Scotto” going back to his previous fame with Alpine Angler) who lives in Hervey Bay where local conditions are stretching a 485SF’s job description. Another mate, Gordon Triplett (who actually works for the Haines Group), regularly runs the width of Moreton Bay and crosses South Passage bar in his…now that’s bending the job description towards the point of catastrophe for, what is after all, a fairly-low-sided hull as offshore fishers go.

I went back to an original test of mine to find I said the 485SF is “the softest ride, driest, most predictable boat its size I’ve ever tested.” For what it’s worth, given the wisdom of hindsight, and a heap more water time later, I wonder if I shouldn’t have described this boat’s ride and rough water handling in more glowing terms. Yep, it’s THAT good!

Reflection though brought me to contemplate an aspect of the hull design I hadn’t thought too deeply about until now — how high its sides are. The 485SF sticks out of the water further than the American bass boat style so popular these days. For example, when you look at what Gordy, Scotto and I (yes, even I have been seen launching over a certain beach down Iluka way and fishing offshore) do fishing wise, those low(ish) sides get a bit debatable.

One aspect of Alex’s original Top Ender concept that’s evolved over time is a trend towards ever-higher sides. Lots of Top Ender derivatives now have sides so high Alex would struggle to see over them. Offshore safety and paranoia about scaly reptiles in the north explain (and to some extent justify) the altitude gain and that brings us to an interesting point to discuss.

Just a few days ago, I tested a 
quality-brand Top Ender with the now well-accepted higher sides and, while my paranoid mind praised the top hamper, the other bloke that talks inside my head was going “hang on a minute...”

This boat’s sides were about average for the current high-sided fashion. Boy oh boy, when any kind of breeze gusted onto one side or other of the bows, while running at speed, it was like someone had pulled the motor onto lock. Bloody hell that boat caught some wind; it was a bitch of a thing to steer!

Do Top Ender sides really NEED to be as high as current fashion makes them I wonder? My boat drifts great in side-winds, thanks to its low(ish) sides, and you never notice a gust onto the bows at speed. As for crocs, no-one’s arguing about higher sides there but, flamin’ hell, people are selling Top Enders and buying bass boats… a decent croc would hardly have to lift his head out of the water to slide aboard one of them.

So in a few words, how does the 485SF shape up with the benefit of 5 odd years of hindsight? Better than ever I reckon, I just have to wonder why anyone would import a bass boat when we have the 485SF. Must be the yee-hah factor eh!

 

Review Supplied by NAFA
http://www.nafa.com.au/review/664.html 

Haines Signature 485SF - Boat Point Review BACK


The Signature 485SF is a new class of fibreglass fisher from The Haines Group and a low-cost alternative to some high-priced bass boats, notes Rick Huckstepp

Pocket Dynamo

A smart little number from the Haines Group has been floated on our waters in the form of the 485SF. For a small boat, this rig has amazing performance and versatility, and we had a good time putting it through its paces down at the Gold Coast recently.

The finish on this boat is as good as it gets in fibreglass, due to the use of  RIVALE technology, a technique which eventually will be more commonly used in this country, if not compulsory, due to its environmental friendliness during fibreglass product construction.

The process is one where two moulds are put together with the required amount of special matt cloth inserted and the void between vacuumed while resin is pumped in. This removes the issue of wet resin vapour flying though the air, but also ensures that there are no air pockets in the finished product.

The resulting products are strong with less chance of air pockets; material usages are more easily controlled and the finish is first class - you can see this throughout the Signature 485SF. How strong? Well if you had been to any of the capital city boat shows last year you would have seen one of these hulls upside down on the floor with a 4WD parked on top of it - that strong!

We found the test boat, chock a block full of stowage and it is here that you realise the advantages of this relatively new technique.

Hatches are heavier, but thinner and stronger than those featuring timber cores seen in the past. The finish is smooth on both sides, due to the fact there is no manual spraying with chopper guns or hand rolling resin into the matt.

At the bow there is a hatch that will take a large Danforth or small grappling anchor. It seemed a shame that such a beautiful finish in here will get knocked around by the ground tackle but a carpet lining might lessen the guilt.

Stepping down onto the forward casting deck is another hatch that features a seat post base inserted within. This is an option we would go for, as there are no bowrails on the forequarters, and a high bumseat is just the thing for stability when standing up in choppy water. Under that hatch is the cranking battery.

This boat can have an optional electric motor mount and a larger battery could be fitted into this compartment. We guess a 130amp/h battery running lengthways along the centreline would be a good supply to a 12V unit, although you would have to source another compartment to install the crank battery. Perhaps in the console would be ideal?

The most aft hatch in the forward casting deck is wide and makes an ideal killtank or icebox as do all the underdeck compartments in the 485SF due to the build and assembly of this craft.

NEXUS BUILD
The Haines Group utilise the same build on the 600RS, 675 and 600 bowrider hulls which they call Nexus, a system whereby the bottom hull is formed and the top liner is lowered inside.

The bottoms of the compartments of the top liner contact the inside of the hull where it is glued with methyl methacrylate. The voids throughout the boat are then pumped with foam to add further strength and sound proofing not to mention offering a boost to buoyancy.

The rolled inner edges of the side coamings on the base hull are further strengthened with the optional installation of an inner moulded coaming to square off the length of the cockpit. The internals of the coamings are filled with long noodles of foam, the same as kids play with in swimming pools. This allows the electrical wiring and other cabling to be passed through the void, among the noodles, while giving this boat positive buoyancy.

Another icebox is situated on the cockpit deck up against the forward casting platform bulkhead and a textured surface deck runs aft to the short casting platform that is loaded with hatches holding safety and other gear.

At the helm, a small wind deflector sits atop a well laid out console. It is small but big enough to do the job, housing a Furuno 7000F combination unit on a gimbal (borrowed for the test) while the Suzuki instrumentation is recessed. The compartment under this console is small but you would get a standard 70amp/h crank battery there if need be.

The swivel seating is removable and can be shifted to even out the weight distribution if need be.

BIG PERFORMANCE
Put to the test, this boat is surprising for its size. We took it out through the Seaway and five kilometres off the coast. Although there was only a small swell running, there was plenty of chop to run over.

Noticeable was the lack of flexing in the hull and the soft quiet ride. We only got the hull to bang once and that is when we went across the wake of a 47-foot Riviera running at full noise. Other than that, this boat is gentle on the bones to say the least and quiet while it is at it.

Fitted with manual cable steering it displayed the typical torque at the helm when trimmed fully in - and it had to be fully in for hard, fast cornering.

Trimmed out, this boat is a little rocket and keeps a bow-down attitude most of the time, so it likes plenty of trim out which does not affect its direct steering.

Also noticeable was the dry ride. We had a wind of about 10 to 15kmh from the southeast and with the wind pushing over various quarters there was no need to dry the sunnies. This was due in part to the aggressive overhang of the coamings to the outside of the hull which downturned any water creeping up the side of the hull.

When seated and holding onto the sides you could feel the water contacting the hand, but deflected down and away. What was missing for the seated passenger was a handrail on that coaming.

You can get this boat in a tiller-control 70hp version and also as a bare shell without the casting decks and console or inner gunwale add-ons. A maximum horsepower of 90 may be fitted to the 485SF, but only with helm wheel operation. As tested, with the latest model DF70 Suzuki four-stroke, this boat is a nicely balanced package offering good holeshot with two large adults aboard.

The engine hummed along at a comfortable cruise speed of 45kmh and 4250rpm. At WOT of 5600rpm it reached a speed of 62kmh, and quietly so.

With an engine operating range of 5000 to 6000rpm there is room to move should you wish to prop this outfit to suit your style of boating. And no matter what that style would be, you will be doing it in style with the 485SF. This is a very tidy rig from The Haines Group.

 

WHAT WE LIKED

  • A low-profile boat that creates less wind drift
  • This could be a cheap alternative to an expensive bass style boat
  • Quiet, dry and soft ride

NOT SO MUCH

  • We tried hard to find fault with this rig but didn't, other than the lack of a handrail for the passenger seated next to the skipper
    HAINES SIGNATURE 485SF
     
    HOW MUCH?
    Price as tested: $36,500
    Options fitted: Nil (Furuno unit not included in test)
     
    GENERAL
    Material: Fibreglass
    Construction: RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission)
    Length: 4.85m
    Beam: 2.05m
    Weight: 320kg (bare shell hull)
     
    CAPACITIES
    Fuel: 130lt
    People: 5
    Rec. max. HP: 90
    Rec. min. HP: 30 (bare shell hull)
    Rec. max. engine weight: 155kg
     
    ENGINE
    Make/model: Suzuki DF70
    Type: Four-cylinder four-stroke
    Rated HP: 70
    Displacement: 1502cc
    Weight: 155kg
    Gearbox ratio: 2.59:1
    Propeller: 19-inch
    VELS rating: 3-star
     
    SUPPLIED BY:
    Springwood Marine,
    3445 Pacific Highway,
    Springwood, Qld, 4127
    Phone: (07) 3884 7250
    Websites: www.springwoodmarine.com.au 

     

     

     Words By Rick Huckstepp

    http://www.boatpoint.com.au/content/reviews/2009/open---dinghy/haines-signature/haines-signature-485sf-13294

  • Haines Signature 485SF - RedBook Review BACK


    The Haines Group unleash a little ripper onto our water ways

    LIKES 
    -- A low profile boat such as this is less affected with wind drift. 
    -- This could be a cheap alternative to an expensive bass style boat. 
    -- Quiet, dry and soft ride. 
    -- This is the sort of boat you would be proud to own!

    DISLIKES 
    -- We tried hard to find fault with this rig but didn’t other than the lack of a hand rail for the passenger seated next to the skipper.
    -- If manual cable steering was retained the engine height should be fine tuned to alleviate aeration at the propeller during tight turns at speed.

    OVERVIEW
    -- Full marks
    Every now and then a boat and motor package arrives on the market that really blows you away! One that even if it's designed purpose doesn’t particularly suit your hankering when it comes to fishing and boating, it is so trendy and well thought out, it gets near full points anyway. That’s what we gave Haines Signature’s 485SF.

    For a small boat, this rig has amazing performance and versatility and the icing on the cake was its practicality and exemplary finish throughout.

    PRICE AND EQUIPMENT
    -- Practical and priced right
    At $36,500 this boat comes well fitted and the amount of stowage it has is the bonus. The fact that the hull is foam filled making all the hatches effective ice boxes, is another bonus.

    While the in-fill mouldings on the coamings are optional, it would be handy to have them as standard as they add a lot to the look of the boat but also add strength to the gunwales.

    LAYOUT
    -- Heaps of stowage
    Every nook and cranny is utilised for stowage and it is here that you realise the advantages of this relatively new manfacturing technique. Hatches are heavier but thinner and stronger than those featuring timber cores seen in the past, and the finish is smooth on both sides due to the fact there is no manual spraying with chopper guns or hand rolling resin into the matt. The downside here is that any blemishes such as knocks and scratches will be more readily noticeable. A good dose of marine carpet throughout will alleviate that.

    At the bow there is a hatch that will take a medium Danforth or small grappling anchor. It seemed a shame that such a beautiful finish inside here had an anchor and chain bouncing around on it; alas, throw in some more carpet!

    Stepping down onto the forward casting deck there is another hatch that features a seat-post base inserted in it. This is an option we would go for as there are no bow rails on the forequarters and a high bum-seat is just the thing for stability when standing up in choppy water and moving around when hand holds are necessary.

    Under that hinged hatch is the cranking battery and it's worth noting that a larger battery could be fitted into this compartment. We guess a 130amp hour running length-ways along the centreline would be a good supply to a 12-volt electric motor although you would have to source another compartment to install the crank battery, and under the console immediately comes to mind.

    This boat may have an optional electric motor mount which is formed as part of the hull during manufacture so it needs to be ordered that way first up.

    The most-aft hatch in the forward casting deck is wide and makes an ideal kill tank or ice box, as do all the other underdeck compartments in the 485SF due to the build and foam infusion which turns this boat into a giant ice box.

    MECHANICAL, HULL AND RIG
    -- Impeccable finish
    The finish on this boat is as good as it gets in fibreglass, due to the use of  RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission). technology, a technique which eventually will be more commonly used in this country, if not compulsory, due to its environmental friendliness during fibreglass product construction.

    The process is one where two moulds are put together with the required amount of special matt cloth inserted between and the void is vacuumed while resin is pumped in. This removes the issue of wet resin vapour flying though the air, and also ensures that there are no air pockets anywhere in the finished product. The resulting products are strong with less chance of air pockets, material usages are more easily controlled and the finish is first class; you can see this throughout the 485SF. How strong? Actually strong enough to drive a 4WD over an upside down hull, as seen at various boat shows around the country, on The Haines Group stand. (Don’t try this at home folks)!

    The top liner is fixed to the hull utilising the same technique on the 600RS, 675 and 600 bow rider hulls which The Haines Group call ‘Nexus’, a system whereby the bottom hull is formed and the top liner is lowered inside, the bottoms of compartments of the top liner contact the inside of the hull where it is glued with methyl methacrylate. The voids throughout the boat are then pumped with foam to add further strength and sound proofing not to mention offering a boost to buoyancy.

    The rolled inner edges of the side coamings on the base hull are further strengthened with the optional installation of an inner moulded coaming to square off the length of the cockpit. The internals of these coamings are then filled with long noodles of foam, the same as those kids play with in swimming pools which allows electrical wiring and other cabling to be passed through the void amongst the noodles without jamming while also giving this boat further positive buoyancy.

    Another ice box is situated on the cockpit deck up against the forward casting platform bulkhead and a textured surface deck runs aft to the short casting platform that is loaded with hatches holding safety and other gear.

    At the helm a small wind deflector sits atop a well-laid-out console. It looks too small to be effective but actually is big enough to do the job, shielding a Furuno 7000F combination unit on a gimbal behind it while the Suzuki instrumentation is recessed. The compartment under this console is small but you would get a standard 70amp hour crank battery there if need be.

    A maximum horsepower of 90 may be fitted to the 485SF but only with a helm wheel operation and not the tiller version. As tested with the latest model DF70 Suzuki four-stroke, this boat is a balanced package offering good hole shot capability with two large adults aboard.

    The engine had a comfortable cruise speed of 45kmh while running at 4250rpm and at WOT of 5600 it reached a speed of 62kmh without too much noise. With an engine operating range of 5000 to 6000rpm there is room to move should you wish to prop this outfit to suit your style of boating. Perhaps you’re looking for faster hole-shot or more wind in the hair at the top end.

    ON THE WATER
    -- Can handle the speed
    Taking the 485SF five kilometres offshore of the Gold Coast amongst swell felt to be a safe affair even though we did not have a lot of freeboard compared with the typical boat you would have out in that sort of water.

    It launched off waves and landed without any bad habits and its lack of flex in the hull when doing so across waves at an angle attests to the hull's rigidity. You will be impressed with the quietness of this hull in the water; we were!

    Fitted with manual cable steering, it displayed typical torque at the helm when trimmed fully in and trim had to be fully in for hard fast cornering to prevent slight aeration at the propeller.

    Trimmed out, this boat is a little rocket and keeps a bow-down attitude most of the time so it likes plenty of trim out which does not affect its direct steering.

    Also noticeable was the dry ride. We had about 10 to 15kmh from the south-east and with wind pushed over various quarters there was no spray. This was due in part to the aggressive overhang of the coamings to the outside of the hull which downturned any water creeping up the side of the hull. When one was seated and holding onto the sides you could feel the water contacting the hands but being totally deflected down and away.

    What was missing for the seated passenger was a hand rail on that coaming. In fact a brace of handles would put the finishing touches to what is, overall, an excellent boat.

    RATINGS
    Overall rating: 4.8/5.0
    Mechanical/equipment/Rig: 4.5/5.0
    Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0
    On the water performance: 4.5/5.0
    Value for money: 4.8/5.0
    X-factor: 4.95/5.0

    Comparable boats
    There is nothing in this league available on the Australian market.

    Specifications- Haines Signature 485SF
    Price as tested:   $36,500  
    Options fitted:   Nil (Furuno unit not included in test)

    GENERAL
    Material: Fibreglass
    Method of build: RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission)
    Length: 4.85m
    Beam: 2.05m
    Weight: 320kg bare shell only

    CAPACITIES
    Fuel: 130l
    People: 5
    Max engine hp: 90
    Minimum engine hp: 30 (bare shell hull)
    Max transom engine weight: 155kg

    ENGINE
    Make and Model: Suzuki DF70
    Type: four-cylinder, four stroke
    Rated hp: 70
    Displacement: 1502cc
    Weight: 155kg 
    Gearbox ratio: 2.59:1
    Propeller: 19-inch

    Supplied by:
    The Haines Group
    www.thehainesgroup.com

     

    Words by Rick Huckstepp

    http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2010/runabout/haines-signature/485sf/haines-signature-485sf-21812?csn_tnet=true

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    485SF

    Optional Extras

    Configurations

    Specifications

    Length 4.85m
    Beam 2.05m
    Deadrise 21–33°
    Fuel 120L option
    Water N/A
    Berths N/A
    Power outboard Options: 40-60HP with tiller configuration | 40-70HP with tiller configuration and outboard well fitted | 40-90HP with console configuration, remote steering and outboard well fitted
    Transom height 20"
    Max outboard weight 170kg
    Hull weight approx. 320kg
    Towing weight approx. 935kg (console)
    BMT length approx. 6.4m (console)
    BMT height approx. 1.75m
    BMT width approx. 2.04m
    Max people 5/450kg
    Max load Options: 400kg with tiller | 400kg with tiller config and outboard well | 615kg with console config and outboard well fitted

    Haines Signature 485SF - Trade A Boat Magazine BACK

    "The Haines Signature 485SF is without doubt the driest, softest riding, most forgiving and safest handling hull its size I’ve ever tested," says Warren Steptoe. So yeah, he likes it.

     
    HAINES SIGNATURE 485SF

     

    TEST: HAINES SIGNATURE 485SF

    To begin with I must confess a personal involvement in this boat, so if my objectiveness as a boat tester is questioned because of that, there's not much I can do about it. You see, my own boat is a prototype of what in the end became one of the most revolutionary boats ever to come from the Haines Group, builders of Haines Signature and Haines Traveller boats,
    and distributors of Suzuki outboards.

    The story is worth relating because where the Haines Signature 485SF came from has much to do with where it's at - and why I'm so unashamedly enthusiastic about it. Some time back I tested a neat little Haines Traveller dinghy, designation TD149, and came away mightily impressed. What blew me away was how much better the hull's roughwater ride and general handling capabilities were compared to the multitude of tinnies you see on the water. The TD149's 4.5m hull did everything your average tinnie could do - only it did it much, much better. Even so, as a fishing boat it wasn't perfect and its interior layout left much to be desired.

    I later expressed these thoughts to Greg Haines over a coffee on the deck of his Gold Coast canal-side home. Typically, Greg mulled over my words before asking me if I'd consider getting involved in a project to build a better fishing boat based on the TD149 hull. It was from this conversation that a hand-built prototype finally evolved.

     

     

    EARLY DEVELOPMENT

    The new model was a simple tiller-steered configuration, with wide overhanging sidedecks hiding a rodrack along each side, and casting decks bow and stern. We fitted a huge icebox across the aft end of the bow-deck and a pair of pedestal seats, and then powered the rig with a 50hp Suzuki four-stroke outboard on the stern and a 55lb thrust Minn Kota Riptide electric on the bows. Then I was sent off fishing to see how well we'd done with weight distribution, relative to the general configuration and allocation of interior space.

    To trim the story before I start boasting about 125cm barramundi and 95cm flathead, I was so happy with the design that I eventually bought it and I'm still happily fishing from it years later.

    So it was from there that the concept Greg and I came up with went into the Haines Group thinktank, and after a couple more prototypes the boat you see here finally emerged for testing.

    Due to marketing considerations related to safety regulations in some States, it had grown to 4.85m, with some tweaking of the underwater shape along the way. The side-console is an option that had always been on the drawingboard, while the original basic configuration of casting decks, icebox and so on remained unchanged. The only change was some interior space gained from the extra length.

    Even so, you'd never call the 485SF's interior radical so much as simple common sense, at least for those who fish anything from trout to bream and flathead to barra. Can I say "common sense" basically designed it? What else could I say?

    Actually, the 485's hull and deck-moulds are revolutionary. Or industry-leading would be a better way to put it…

     

     

    INDUSTRY LEADER

    While the model was in development the Haines Group had for some time also been working on a new resin transfer technology. It was named "RIVALE" which stood for the acronym "Resin Injected Vacuum Assisted Low Emission". The RIVALE method pressure-injects resin into a mould comprising male and female halves, whereas traditional fibreglass (more correctly known as GRP, or glass reinforced plastic) is laid up inside a female mould. With RIVALE you end up with a significantly thinner, much stronger, and yet substantially lighter moulding with a smooth finish on both sides, rather than traditional GRP's rough interior. Material waste and environmental emissions are both dramatically reduced as are production costs.

    Haines Group Production Manager John Haines (Jnr) told me that the labour component in building a 485SF hull averages 14 man hours where it took around 50 man hours to build its predecessors. So while RIVALE is more expensive to set up initially, once set up it's a total win situation.

     

     

    FINAL TOUCHES

    Only one major change from "my" prototype was evident in the finished 485SF, and that was separate hull and deck-moulds with foam-filling between. Bonding everything into a singular unit is another proprietary technology the Haines Group calls "Nexus". This technology gives the 485SF's hull formidable structural integrity and of course it must float so inherent safety aspects aren't to be understated either.

    Earlier versions of similar technologies were developed overseas of course, but RIVALE was new in this country. Thus my "industry-leading" comment.

    At the time of writing this boat test, it's been some months since my first experience with the 485SF and I've subsequently spent a lot more time in three different versions, with a fourth imminent during final judging for TrailerBoat's Australia's Greatest Boats Awards (AGB). I mention this because two of the 485 SFs I've tested were powered by 70hp Suzukis - one with a 60 and one coming up for AGB with a 90.

    Both 70hp-powered boats proved nothing short of brilliant. The 485SF is without hesitation or doubt the driest, softest riding, most forgiving and safest handling hull its size I've ever tested. And I mean tested. Boat tests usually mean a few hours out on the water, and boating being boating (and testers have a few tricks they like to pull on test boats) means you experience conditions on the day as they come and then comment accordingly.

    My experiences in the 485SF go way, way beyond that. Responsible boatbuilders like the Haines Group acknowledge that some (usually inexperienced) owners will get themselves into sketchy situations. There's only one way to find out what's going to happen when some ratbag pushes a boat past sane limits, and that's for the testing processes to step beyond sane limits to see what happens.

    Suffice to say I've been there and done that and you, the reader, might note how confidently I used the words "most forgiving and safest handling" a moment ago.

    The boat powered by a 60 belongs to my mate Scott Mitchell, who chose a 60 because of regulations on a dam he fishes. Scotto's boat is also equipped with all the bells and whistles you can imagine, so it's hardly a lightweight. Its performance with the 60 proved of bit of a disappointment after the two lighter boats with 70s.

    Perhaps this is to be expected, because with more weight and less horsepower it's going to lack something. However, keeping in mind that the hull is rated up to 90hp, there's a clear message to potential 485SF owners that, unless they face similar restrictions to Scott, 70hp is a near perfect match for the 485SF hull.

    As for 90hp, given how much sheer fun this hull is to throw around with a 70 on the back (and that it performs well enough to tow wake toys with a 70) a 90 should be exhilarating. Who's looking forward to testing for the Australia's Greatest Boats Award? Me? Hell yeah!

     

     

    BELLS AND WHISTLES

    Coming back to earth at this point, it has to be said that the boats seen in our pics, and certainly Scott Mitchell's (the bells and whistles version) are fully optioned. Part of the RIVALE concept with the 485SF hull is to allow various configurations, starting with a basic thwart-seat layout without a deck-moulding. The base model 485SF package comes in at just over fifteen grand including a 30hp two-stroke Suzuki and trailer.

    From there the price climbs after the deck-moulding is added. It incorporates the liner for the big icebox, which can be plumbed as a livewell. There's also an underdeck fishpit which, due to the foam-filling would serve very well as an icebox. Plumbing for a livewell centrally located in the aft casting deck converts it from dry stowage.

    More stowage is available in separate lockers each side of the aft casting deck as well as in another locker situated forward of the icebox in the bow casting deck. An anchorwell is set into a short foredeck, while a side-console is the final option.

    One option I hadn't seen until stepping aboard Scott's boat (owing to the fact that it was still under development when initial testing occurred) was a rodlocker incorporated into the boat's interior (deck) moulding along the port side.

     

     

    SMALL COMPROMISE

    If you look at our pics you'll see vertical rodracks holding eight rods. These worked well enough I suppose but to my mind expensive rods are best stowed horizontally where a wayward cast can't snatch one. Rodracks under the sidedecks along each side of my prototype boat were central to its design, so my thoughts about this are clear enough. Having said that, RIVALE's unitised hull construction has enough quantifiable advantages in so many other ways for some compromise to become necessary - and the rodlocker's it unfortunately.

    I also noted that to open the locker hatch in Scott's boat you had to lift the passenger seat out of its deck-socket first. It's an inconvenience which only increased my disappointment in the rodlocker. As for negative thoughts on the 485SF, that rodlocker's as bad as it gets!

    Since its interior embodies what I feel a fishing boat its size should be, any comment about how good the 485SF is to fish from would be a tad biased. We actually towed a model with an inflatable doughnut for one of the photo shoots I was involved in with the 485SF, and while that's not so much my thing as fishing, the exercise did show how well this boat performed as a tow vehicle.

    Swinging a 19in pitch, three-blade aluminium Suzuki propeller, the hull was planing cleanly in just over three seconds, reaching a top speed with a brand new and still "factory stiff" 70 Suzuki of 35kts on the dot. And there's probably a little more to come there as the motor beds in and frees up.

     

     

    On the plane...

    Super fishing friendly layout

    The best hull in this size on the water

    More dry stowage than you'd expect in an open fishing boat

     

     

    Dragging the chain...


    Rodlocker maybe a little disappointing

     



    Specifications: Haines Signature 485SF

     

     

     

     

    GENERAL

    Type: Side-console sportfishing boat

    Material: RIVALE moulded GRP composites

    Length: 4.85 m

    Beam: 2.05m

    Deadrise: 21°

    Hull weight: 320kg plus options

    BMT trailering weight: 750kg+

     

     

    CAPACITIES

    Fuel: 130lt

    People: 5

    Min HP: 30 (basic version)

    Max HP: 90

     

     

    ENGINE

    Make/model: Suzuki DF70

    Type: Four-cylinder inline DOHC EFI four-stroke

    Rated HP: 70

    Displacement: 1502cc

    Weight: 160kg

    Gearbox Ratio: 2.59:1

    Test propeller: 19in pitch Suzuki aluminium

     

     

    MANUFACTURED & SUPPLIED BY

    The Haines Group

    140 Viking Drv

    Wacol, Qld, 4076

    Web: www.thehainesgroup.com

     

    Words by Warren Steptoe

    Originally published in TrailerBoat 259

    http://www.tradeboats.com.au/tradeaboat-reviews/boats/1008/haines-signature-485sf-%282010%29-review/

     

    Haines Signature 485SF - Trade Boats BACK

    The Signature 485SF is a new class of fibreglass fisher from The Haines Group and a low-cost alternative to some high-priced bass boats, notes Rick Huckstepp

     

    POCKET DYNAMO
    A smart little number from the Haines Group has been floated on our waters in the form of the 485SF. For a small boat, this rig has amazing performance and versatility, and we had a good time putting it through its paces down at the Gold Coast recently.
    The finish on this boat is as good as it gets in fibreglass, due to the use of  RIVALE technology, a technique which eventually will be more commonly used in this country, if not compulsory, due to its environmental friendliness during fibreglass product construction.
    The process is one where two moulds are put together with the required amount of special matt cloth inserted between and the void between is vacuumed while resin is pumped in. This removes the issue of wet resin vapour flying though the air, but also ensures that there are no air pockets anywhere in the finished product.
    The resulting products are strong with less chance of air pockets, material usages are more easily controlled and the finish is first class ? you can see this throughout the Signature 485SF. How strong? Well if you had been to any of the capital city boat shows last year you would have seen one of these hulls upside down on the floor with a 4WD parked on top of it - that strong!
    We found the test boat, chock a block full of stowage and it is here that you realise the advantages of this relatively new technique.
    Hatches are heavier but thinner and stronger than those featuring timber cores seen in the past and the finish is smooth on both sides due to the fact there is no manual spraying with chopper guns or hand rolling resin into the matt.
    At the bow there is a hatch that will take a large Danforth or small grappling anchor. It seemed a shame that such a beautiful finish inside here would get knocked around by the ground tackle but a carpet lining might lessen the guilt.
    Stepping down onto the forward casting deck there is another hatch that features a seat post base inserted in it. This is an option we would go for as there are no bowrails on the forequarters and a high bumseat is just the thing for stability when standing up in choppy water. Under that hatch is the cranking battery.
    This boat may have an optional electric motor mount and a larger battery could be fitted into this compartment. We guess a 130amp/h battery running lengthways along the centreline would be a good supply to a 12V unit, although you would have to source another compartment to install the crank battery. Perhaps in the console would be ideal?
    The most aft hatch in the forward casting deck is wide and makes an ideal killtank or icebox as do all of the other underdeck compartments in the 485SF due to the build and assembly of this craft.

     

    NEXUS BUILD
    The Haines Group utilise the same build on the 600RS, 675 and 600 bowrider hulls which they call Nexus, a system whereby the bottom hull is formed and the top liner is lowered inside.
    The bottoms of the compartments of the top liner contact the inside of the hull where it is glued with methyl methacrylate. The voids throughout the boat are then pumped with foam to add further strength and sound proofing not to mention offering a boost to buoyancy.
    The rolled inner edges of the side coamings on the base hull are further strengthened with the optional installation of an inner moulded coaming to square off the length of the cockpit. The internals of these coamings are then filled with long noodles of foam, the same as those kids play with in swimming pools. This allows the electrical wiring and other cabling to be passed through the void, among the noodles, while giving this boat positive buoyancy.
    Another icebox is situated on the cockpit deck up against the forward casting platform bulkhead and a textured surface deck runs aft to the short casting platform that is loaded with hatches holding safety and other gear.
    At the helm, a small wind deflector sits atop a well laid out console. It is small but big enough to do the job, housing a Furuno 7000F combination unit on a gimbal (borrowed for the test) while the Suzuki instrumentation is recessed. The compartment under this console is small but you would get a standard 70amp/h crank battery there if need be.
    The swivel seating is removable can be shifted to even out the weight distribution if need be.

     

    BIG PERFORMANCE
    Put to the test, this boat is surprising for its size. We took it out through the Seaway and five kilometres off the coast. Although there was only a small swell running, there was plenty of chop to run over.
    Noticeable was the lack of flexing in the hull and the soft quiet ride. We only got the hull to bang once and that is when we went across the wake of a 47-foot Riviera at full noise running north along the Broadwater. Other than that, this boat is gentle on the bones to say the least and quiet while it is at it.
    Fitted with manual cable steering it displayed the typical torque at the helm when trimmed fully in ? and it had to be fully in for hard fast cornering.
    Trimmed out, this boat is a little rocket and keeps a bow-down attitude most of the time, so it likes plenty of trim out which does not affect its direct steering.
    Also noticeable was the dry ride. We had a wind of about 10 to 15kmh from the southeast and with the wind pushing over various quarters there was no need to dry the sunnies. This was due in part to the aggressive overhang of the coamings to the outside of the hull which downturned any water creeping up the side of the hull.
    When one was seated and holding onto the sides you could feel the water contacting the hand, but deflected down and away. What was missing for the seated passenger was a handrail on that coaming.
     You may get this boat in a tiller-control 70hp version and also as a bare shell without the casting decks and console or inner gunwale add-ons. A maximum horsepower of 90 may be fitted to the 485SF but only with a helm wheel operation. As tested, with the latest model DF70 Suzuki four-stroke, this boat is a nicely balanced package offering good holeshot capability with two large adults aboard.
    The engine hummed along at its comfortable cruise speed of 45kmh while running at 4250rpm and at WOT of 5600 it reached a speed of 62kmh and quietly so.
    With an engine operating range of 5000 to 6000rpm there is room to move should you wish to prop this outfit to suit your style of boating. And no matter what that style would be, you will be doing it in style with the 485SF. This is a very tidy rig from The Haines Group.

     

    WHAT WE LIKED
    A low-profile boat that creates less wind drift
    This could be a cheap alternative to an expensive bass style boat Quiet, dry and soft ride

     

    NOT SO MUCH
    We tried hard to find fault with this rig but didn't other than the lack of a handrail for the passenger seated next to the skipper

     

     

    Specifications: Haines Signature 485SF

    GENERAL
    Material:    Fibreglass
    Construction: RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission)
    Length: 4.85m
    Beam: 2.05m
    Weight: 320kg (bare shell hull)

    CAPACITIES
    Fuel: 130lt
    People: 5
    Rec. max. HP: 90
    Rec. min. HP: 30 (bare shell hull)
    Rec. max. engine weight: 155kg

    ENGINE
    Make/model: Suzuki DF70
    Type: Four-cylinder four-stroke
    Rated HP: 70
    Displacement: 1502cc
    Weight: 155kg 
    Gearbox ratio: 2.59:1
    Propeller: 19-inch
    VELS rating: 3-star

    SUPPLIED BY
    Springwood Marine,
    3445 Pacific Highway,
    Springwood, Qld, 4127

     

    Words by Rick Huckstepp

    Originally published in TrailerBoat #240

    http://www.tradeboats.com.au/trailerboat-reviews/boats/0907/haines-signature-485sf-review/

    Haines Signature 485SF - NAFA Review BACK

    Still something special after five years, we revisit a standout fibreglass Top Ender-style boat that begs the question: why would anyone bother importing a US bass boat?

    This boat and I have some history. It all began when I tested its ancestor, a Haines Traveller TD149 dinghy and history records that I liked a prototype for a new model based on it so much I bought it! Getting on for 7 years later, that boat remains my soul mate and that’s ‘nuff said about a now timeworn story...

    From “my” prototype, the Haines Group worked away for the best part of 2 years while I was in and out of progressively updated versions culminating, when I was a judge at a “boat of the year” type event, in what’s now called the Signature 485SF. It should have won, and would have, if certain fellow judges ever travelled north far enough to see what goes on in the real world...

    Which brings us to 2012 and the Haines Group asking me to revisit the Signature 485SF with the wisdom of hindsight.

    Before getting onto that though, a quick refresher about the 485SF is in order. The 485SF is built with a new production process the Haines Group developed called “Rivale”. Essentially, instead of traditional application of resin to mat, laid up inside a female mould, Rivale injects tightly-controlled amounts of resin into a two-piece mould already containing fibreglass matting.

    Because quality and quantities are so precisely controlled, a boat built with Rivale is at the same time thinner, lighter and considerably stronger. The process is also environmentally friendly due to control of emissions inside the enclosed mould.

    The 485SF’s interior (deck) and hull mouldings are then bonded together with another Haines Group process it calls “Nexus” — space between the deck and outer hull is foam filled to create a singular unit of formidable structural integrity.

    How successful the 485SF’s been is no surprise to me. I’ve tested about 5 different ones, and fished from a couple a fair bit. Friends of mine have bought them, and are as similarly besotted as I am with the prototype, including my mate Scott Mitchell (widely known as “Scotto” going back to his previous fame with Alpine Angler) who lives in Hervey Bay where local conditions are stretching a 485SF’s job description. Another mate, Gordon Triplett (who actually works for the Haines Group), regularly runs the width of Moreton Bay and crosses South Passage bar in his…now that’s bending the job description towards the point of catastrophe for, what is after all, a fairly-low-sided hull as offshore fishers go.

    I went back to an original test of mine to find I said the 485SF is “the softest ride, driest, most predictable boat its size I’ve ever tested.” For what it’s worth, given the wisdom of hindsight, and a heap more water time later, I wonder if I shouldn’t have described this boat’s ride and rough water handling in more glowing terms. Yep, it’s THAT good!

    Reflection though brought me to contemplate an aspect of the hull design I hadn’t thought too deeply about until now — how high its sides are. The 485SF sticks out of the water further than the American bass boat style so popular these days. For example, when you look at what Gordy, Scotto and I (yes, even I have been seen launching over a certain beach down Iluka way and fishing offshore) do fishing wise, those low(ish) sides get a bit debatable.

    One aspect of Alex’s original Top Ender concept that’s evolved over time is a trend towards ever-higher sides. Lots of Top Ender derivatives now have sides so high Alex would struggle to see over them. Offshore safety and paranoia about scaly reptiles in the north explain (and to some extent justify) the altitude gain and that brings us to an interesting point to discuss.

    Just a few days ago, I tested a 
quality-brand Top Ender with the now well-accepted higher sides and, while my paranoid mind praised the top hamper, the other bloke that talks inside my head was going “hang on a minute...”

    This boat’s sides were about average for the current high-sided fashion. Boy oh boy, when any kind of breeze gusted onto one side or other of the bows, while running at speed, it was like someone had pulled the motor onto lock. Bloody hell that boat caught some wind; it was a bitch of a thing to steer!

    Do Top Ender sides really NEED to be as high as current fashion makes them I wonder? My boat drifts great in side-winds, thanks to its low(ish) sides, and you never notice a gust onto the bows at speed. As for crocs, no-one’s arguing about higher sides there but, flamin’ hell, people are selling Top Enders and buying bass boats… a decent croc would hardly have to lift his head out of the water to slide aboard one of them.

    So in a few words, how does the 485SF shape up with the benefit of 5 odd years of hindsight? Better than ever I reckon, I just have to wonder why anyone would import a bass boat when we have the 485SF. Must be the yee-hah factor eh!

     

    Review Supplied by NAFA
    http://www.nafa.com.au/review/664.html 

    Haines Signature 485SF - Boat Point Review BACK

    The Signature 485SF is a new class of fibreglass fisher from The Haines Group and a low-cost alternative to some high-priced bass boats, notes Rick Huckstepp

    Pocket Dynamo

    A smart little number from the Haines Group has been floated on our waters in the form of the 485SF. For a small boat, this rig has amazing performance and versatility, and we had a good time putting it through its paces down at the Gold Coast recently.

    The finish on this boat is as good as it gets in fibreglass, due to the use of  RIVALE technology, a technique which eventually will be more commonly used in this country, if not compulsory, due to its environmental friendliness during fibreglass product construction.

    The process is one where two moulds are put together with the required amount of special matt cloth inserted and the void between vacuumed while resin is pumped in. This removes the issue of wet resin vapour flying though the air, but also ensures that there are no air pockets in the finished product.

    The resulting products are strong with less chance of air pockets; material usages are more easily controlled and the finish is first class - you can see this throughout the Signature 485SF. How strong? Well if you had been to any of the capital city boat shows last year you would have seen one of these hulls upside down on the floor with a 4WD parked on top of it - that strong!

    We found the test boat, chock a block full of stowage and it is here that you realise the advantages of this relatively new technique.

    Hatches are heavier, but thinner and stronger than those featuring timber cores seen in the past. The finish is smooth on both sides, due to the fact there is no manual spraying with chopper guns or hand rolling resin into the matt.

    At the bow there is a hatch that will take a large Danforth or small grappling anchor. It seemed a shame that such a beautiful finish in here will get knocked around by the ground tackle but a carpet lining might lessen the guilt.

    Stepping down onto the forward casting deck is another hatch that features a seat post base inserted within. This is an option we would go for, as there are no bowrails on the forequarters, and a high bumseat is just the thing for stability when standing up in choppy water. Under that hatch is the cranking battery.

    This boat can have an optional electric motor mount and a larger battery could be fitted into this compartment. We guess a 130amp/h battery running lengthways along the centreline would be a good supply to a 12V unit, although you would have to source another compartment to install the crank battery. Perhaps in the console would be ideal?

    The most aft hatch in the forward casting deck is wide and makes an ideal killtank or icebox as do all the underdeck compartments in the 485SF due to the build and assembly of this craft.

    NEXUS BUILD
    The Haines Group utilise the same build on the 600RS, 675 and 600 bowrider hulls which they call Nexus, a system whereby the bottom hull is formed and the top liner is lowered inside.

    The bottoms of the compartments of the top liner contact the inside of the hull where it is glued with methyl methacrylate. The voids throughout the boat are then pumped with foam to add further strength and sound proofing not to mention offering a boost to buoyancy.

    The rolled inner edges of the side coamings on the base hull are further strengthened with the optional installation of an inner moulded coaming to square off the length of the cockpit. The internals of the coamings are filled with long noodles of foam, the same as kids play with in swimming pools. This allows the electrical wiring and other cabling to be passed through the void, among the noodles, while giving this boat positive buoyancy.

    Another icebox is situated on the cockpit deck up against the forward casting platform bulkhead and a textured surface deck runs aft to the short casting platform that is loaded with hatches holding safety and other gear.

    At the helm, a small wind deflector sits atop a well laid out console. It is small but big enough to do the job, housing a Furuno 7000F combination unit on a gimbal (borrowed for the test) while the Suzuki instrumentation is recessed. The compartment under this console is small but you would get a standard 70amp/h crank battery there if need be.

    The swivel seating is removable and can be shifted to even out the weight distribution if need be.

    BIG PERFORMANCE
    Put to the test, this boat is surprising for its size. We took it out through the Seaway and five kilometres off the coast. Although there was only a small swell running, there was plenty of chop to run over.

    Noticeable was the lack of flexing in the hull and the soft quiet ride. We only got the hull to bang once and that is when we went across the wake of a 47-foot Riviera running at full noise. Other than that, this boat is gentle on the bones to say the least and quiet while it is at it.

    Fitted with manual cable steering it displayed the typical torque at the helm when trimmed fully in - and it had to be fully in for hard, fast cornering.

    Trimmed out, this boat is a little rocket and keeps a bow-down attitude most of the time, so it likes plenty of trim out which does not affect its direct steering.

    Also noticeable was the dry ride. We had a wind of about 10 to 15kmh from the southeast and with the wind pushing over various quarters there was no need to dry the sunnies. This was due in part to the aggressive overhang of the coamings to the outside of the hull which downturned any water creeping up the side of the hull.

    When seated and holding onto the sides you could feel the water contacting the hand, but deflected down and away. What was missing for the seated passenger was a handrail on that coaming.

    You can get this boat in a tiller-control 70hp version and also as a bare shell without the casting decks and console or inner gunwale add-ons. A maximum horsepower of 90 may be fitted to the 485SF, but only with helm wheel operation. As tested, with the latest model DF70 Suzuki four-stroke, this boat is a nicely balanced package offering good holeshot with two large adults aboard.

    The engine hummed along at a comfortable cruise speed of 45kmh and 4250rpm. At WOT of 5600rpm it reached a speed of 62kmh, and quietly so.

    With an engine operating range of 5000 to 6000rpm there is room to move should you wish to prop this outfit to suit your style of boating. And no matter what that style would be, you will be doing it in style with the 485SF. This is a very tidy rig from The Haines Group.

     

    WHAT WE LIKED

    • A low-profile boat that creates less wind drift
    • This could be a cheap alternative to an expensive bass style boat
    • Quiet, dry and soft ride

    NOT SO MUCH

  • We tried hard to find fault with this rig but didn't, other than the lack of a handrail for the passenger seated next to the skipper
    HAINES SIGNATURE 485SF
     
    HOW MUCH?
    Price as tested: $36,500
    Options fitted: Nil (Furuno unit not included in test)
     
    GENERAL
    Material: Fibreglass
    Construction: RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission)
    Length: 4.85m
    Beam: 2.05m
    Weight: 320kg (bare shell hull)
     
    CAPACITIES
    Fuel: 130lt
    People: 5
    Rec. max. HP: 90
    Rec. min. HP: 30 (bare shell hull)
    Rec. max. engine weight: 155kg
     
    ENGINE
    Make/model: Suzuki DF70
    Type: Four-cylinder four-stroke
    Rated HP: 70
    Displacement: 1502cc
    Weight: 155kg
    Gearbox ratio: 2.59:1
    Propeller: 19-inch
    VELS rating: 3-star
     
    SUPPLIED BY:
    Springwood Marine,
    3445 Pacific Highway,
    Springwood, Qld, 4127
    Phone: (07) 3884 7250
    Websites: www.springwoodmarine.com.au 

     

     

     Words By Rick Huckstepp

    http://www.boatpoint.com.au/content/reviews/2009/open---dinghy/haines-signature/haines-signature-485sf-13294

  • Haines Signature 485SF - RedBook Review BACK

    The Haines Group unleash a little ripper onto our water ways

    LIKES 
    -- A low profile boat such as this is less affected with wind drift. 
    -- This could be a cheap alternative to an expensive bass style boat. 
    -- Quiet, dry and soft ride. 
    -- This is the sort of boat you would be proud to own!

    DISLIKES 
    -- We tried hard to find fault with this rig but didn’t other than the lack of a hand rail for the passenger seated next to the skipper.
    -- If manual cable steering was retained the engine height should be fine tuned to alleviate aeration at the propeller during tight turns at speed.

    OVERVIEW
    -- Full marks
    Every now and then a boat and motor package arrives on the market that really blows you away! One that even if it's designed purpose doesn’t particularly suit your hankering when it comes to fishing and boating, it is so trendy and well thought out, it gets near full points anyway. That’s what we gave Haines Signature’s 485SF.

    For a small boat, this rig has amazing performance and versatility and the icing on the cake was its practicality and exemplary finish throughout.

    PRICE AND EQUIPMENT
    -- Practical and priced right
    At $36,500 this boat comes well fitted and the amount of stowage it has is the bonus. The fact that the hull is foam filled making all the hatches effective ice boxes, is another bonus.

    While the in-fill mouldings on the coamings are optional, it would be handy to have them as standard as they add a lot to the look of the boat but also add strength to the gunwales.

    LAYOUT
    -- Heaps of stowage
    Every nook and cranny is utilised for stowage and it is here that you realise the advantages of this relatively new manfacturing technique. Hatches are heavier but thinner and stronger than those featuring timber cores seen in the past, and the finish is smooth on both sides due to the fact there is no manual spraying with chopper guns or hand rolling resin into the matt. The downside here is that any blemishes such as knocks and scratches will be more readily noticeable. A good dose of marine carpet throughout will alleviate that.

    At the bow there is a hatch that will take a medium Danforth or small grappling anchor. It seemed a shame that such a beautiful finish inside here had an anchor and chain bouncing around on it; alas, throw in some more carpet!

    Stepping down onto the forward casting deck there is another hatch that features a seat-post base inserted in it. This is an option we would go for as there are no bow rails on the forequarters and a high bum-seat is just the thing for stability when standing up in choppy water and moving around when hand holds are necessary.

    Under that hinged hatch is the cranking battery and it's worth noting that a larger battery could be fitted into this compartment. We guess a 130amp hour running length-ways along the centreline would be a good supply to a 12-volt electric motor although you would have to source another compartment to install the crank battery, and under the console immediately comes to mind.

    This boat may have an optional electric motor mount which is formed as part of the hull during manufacture so it needs to be ordered that way first up.

    The most-aft hatch in the forward casting deck is wide and makes an ideal kill tank or ice box, as do all the other underdeck compartments in the 485SF due to the build and foam infusion which turns this boat into a giant ice box.

    MECHANICAL, HULL AND RIG
    -- Impeccable finish
    The finish on this boat is as good as it gets in fibreglass, due to the use of  RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission). technology, a technique which eventually will be more commonly used in this country, if not compulsory, due to its environmental friendliness during fibreglass product construction.

    The process is one where two moulds are put together with the required amount of special matt cloth inserted between and the void is vacuumed while resin is pumped in. This removes the issue of wet resin vapour flying though the air, and also ensures that there are no air pockets anywhere in the finished product. The resulting products are strong with less chance of air pockets, material usages are more easily controlled and the finish is first class; you can see this throughout the 485SF. How strong? Actually strong enough to drive a 4WD over an upside down hull, as seen at various boat shows around the country, on The Haines Group stand. (Don’t try this at home folks)!

    The top liner is fixed to the hull utilising the same technique on the 600RS, 675 and 600 bow rider hulls which The Haines Group call ‘Nexus’, a system whereby the bottom hull is formed and the top liner is lowered inside, the bottoms of compartments of the top liner contact the inside of the hull where it is glued with methyl methacrylate. The voids throughout the boat are then pumped with foam to add further strength and sound proofing not to mention offering a boost to buoyancy.

    The rolled inner edges of the side coamings on the base hull are further strengthened with the optional installation of an inner moulded coaming to square off the length of the cockpit. The internals of these coamings are then filled with long noodles of foam, the same as those kids play with in swimming pools which allows electrical wiring and other cabling to be passed through the void amongst the noodles without jamming while also giving this boat further positive buoyancy.

    Another ice box is situated on the cockpit deck up against the forward casting platform bulkhead and a textured surface deck runs aft to the short casting platform that is loaded with hatches holding safety and other gear.

    At the helm a small wind deflector sits atop a well-laid-out console. It looks too small to be effective but actually is big enough to do the job, shielding a Furuno 7000F combination unit on a gimbal behind it while the Suzuki instrumentation is recessed. The compartment under this console is small but you would get a standard 70amp hour crank battery there if need be.

    A maximum horsepower of 90 may be fitted to the 485SF but only with a helm wheel operation and not the tiller version. As tested with the latest model DF70 Suzuki four-stroke, this boat is a balanced package offering good hole shot capability with two large adults aboard.

    The engine had a comfortable cruise speed of 45kmh while running at 4250rpm and at WOT of 5600 it reached a speed of 62kmh without too much noise. With an engine operating range of 5000 to 6000rpm there is room to move should you wish to prop this outfit to suit your style of boating. Perhaps you’re looking for faster hole-shot or more wind in the hair at the top end.

    ON THE WATER
    -- Can handle the speed
    Taking the 485SF five kilometres offshore of the Gold Coast amongst swell felt to be a safe affair even though we did not have a lot of freeboard compared with the typical boat you would have out in that sort of water.

    It launched off waves and landed without any bad habits and its lack of flex in the hull when doing so across waves at an angle attests to the hull's rigidity. You will be impressed with the quietness of this hull in the water; we were!

    Fitted with manual cable steering, it displayed typical torque at the helm when trimmed fully in and trim had to be fully in for hard fast cornering to prevent slight aeration at the propeller.

    Trimmed out, this boat is a little rocket and keeps a bow-down attitude most of the time so it likes plenty of trim out which does not affect its direct steering.

    Also noticeable was the dry ride. We had about 10 to 15kmh from the south-east and with wind pushed over various quarters there was no spray. This was due in part to the aggressive overhang of the coamings to the outside of the hull which downturned any water creeping up the side of the hull. When one was seated and holding onto the sides you could feel the water contacting the hands but being totally deflected down and away.

    What was missing for the seated passenger was a hand rail on that coaming. In fact a brace of handles would put the finishing touches to what is, overall, an excellent boat.

    RATINGS
    Overall rating: 4.8/5.0
    Mechanical/equipment/Rig: 4.5/5.0
    Packaging and practicality: 4.9/5.0
    On the water performance: 4.5/5.0
    Value for money: 4.8/5.0
    X-factor: 4.95/5.0

    Comparable boats
    There is nothing in this league available on the Australian market.

    Specifications- Haines Signature 485SF
    Price as tested:   $36,500  
    Options fitted:   Nil (Furuno unit not included in test)

    GENERAL
    Material: Fibreglass
    Method of build: RIVALE (resin injected, vacuum assist, low emission)
    Length: 4.85m
    Beam: 2.05m
    Weight: 320kg bare shell only

    CAPACITIES
    Fuel: 130l
    People: 5
    Max engine hp: 90
    Minimum engine hp: 30 (bare shell hull)
    Max transom engine weight: 155kg

    ENGINE
    Make and Model: Suzuki DF70
    Type: four-cylinder, four stroke
    Rated hp: 70
    Displacement: 1502cc
    Weight: 155kg 
    Gearbox ratio: 2.59:1
    Propeller: 19-inch

    Supplied by:
    The Haines Group
    www.thehainesgroup.com

     

    Words by Rick Huckstepp

    http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2010/runabout/haines-signature/485sf/haines-signature-485sf-21812?csn_tnet=true

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