702L

  • The flagship of Signature™ boats
  • Take anywhere cruiser
  • Quick to convert from family cruiser
  • to offshore fishing machine
  • Sliding lockable door
  • Provisions to fit all the creature 
  • comforts – such as Macrosuede 
  • bunk cushions, on board galley with 
  • fresh water (hot and cold) stove and 
  • even the kitchen sink
  • Built in toilet
  • 240 litres fuel tank capacity
  • Tows behind a larger size 4wd
  • 8 people
  • Signature Variable Deadrise Hull

 

Configurations


Take a Tour


Specifications


Moulded length with bowsprit 7.77m
Length 6.86m
Beam 2.50M
Deadrise 21-33º
Fuel 240L
Water 38L OPT
Berths 2
Power outboard 150-300hp
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 350kg
Hull weight 1,400kg approx
Towing weight 2,800-3,200kg
BMT length 9.2m
BMT height 2.43m
BMT width 2.50m
Max people 8/720kg
Max load 1,000kg (single) / 1,090kg (twin)

Optional Extras


Haines Signature 702L - Boat Point Review BACK


As either an offshore sportsfisher or a family cruiser, the Haines Signature 702L boasts enough features and attention to detail to pack one hell of a punch

Although the Haines Signature 702L was first launched back in September 2000, it has taken until now for us to get our hands on this trailerable flagship of the Signature range. And what better boat to test than Haines' own family boat, which has been loaded with just about every conceivable option.

The Haines Signature 702L is the perfect example of just how versatile a 7m boat can be. No doubt many hours of thought have gone into the design of this maxi trailerboat, which makes the maximum use of available space, enabling it to perform its duties as both an offshore sportsfisher and a family cruiser.

While there is no mistaking the stylish lines and impeccable gelcoat finish of a Signature, it is this boat's hidden treasures that make it stand out from the crowd.

The 702L features a purpose-built bowsprit ladder that folds out of the way when not in use. When extended, it allows people to board and disembark over the bow, for example, when back anchored off a beach with the bow toward the sand.

A Muir Horizon anchor winch is located inside the anchorwell with cleats each side of a sacrificial board that protects the gelcoat under the chain.

To maximise cabin volume there are no sidedecks, so access to the bow is via a large tinted Weaver hatch in the roof of the cabin or through a central opening in the windscreen aided by steps rebated in the edge of the companionway bulkhead.

A split stainless bowrail completes the foredeck hardware.

Inside the cabin, immediately behind the starboard bulkhead is an optional electric toilet. The cabin is lined and features user-friendly upholstery. With an infill in place, the V-berth converts into a large double berth.

WORRY-FREE WIRING
The dash fascia at the helm unclips and folds aft on hinges, providing access to the rear of the electronics and steering. This is a fantastic idea and makes upgrades and maintenance to the helm a breeze, as well as getting rid of the mass of wiring that often hangs inside the cabin. Seastar hydraulic steering with tilt-adjustable hub adds comfort while sitting or standing when underway.

The module supporting the passenger seat is another surprise package. The seat and its base tilt forward and the rear-cushioned seat on the module folds out and acts as a windbreak for the gas stove located inside. A sink and a pressurised freshwater tap also services this area.

The floor hatch adjacent to this concealed galley doubles as a cockpit table and when removed allows the chef to work wonders without having to bend over the stove.

The compartment for standing at the galley can also be used for storage or as an icebox. Both it and the cabin footwell feature a bung that drains to the bilge.

Two-tier sidepockets provide plenty of storage space below each gunwale and also incorporate horizontal rod or gaff racks.

At the aft end of the port side storage shelf, both fresh and saltwater washdowns are provided via bayonet fittings. A nozzle that doubles as a shower rose may be fitted to either for showering or deckwash purposes.

HIDDEN TREASURES
The transom also features several hidden treasures. On the port side is a livebait tank while on the starboard side twin batteries and isolation switch are located high in the cavity away from potential splashing.

A centrally located baitboard sits between the corner hatches and drains into the enginewell. It opens to reveal a lift-out tray, which when removed exposes a cavernous storage area for spare ropes, fenders and other gear that is better out of sight when not in use. This storage area may be accessed via a door in the face of the transom, so that fenders and the like may be removed or stored without going in through the top and having to lift out the baitboard trays.

Another hatch in the transom bulkhead reveals five Plano tackle draws that can hold a multitude of lures and terminal tackle.

The cockpit is self-draining, with a gutter around the outside of the cockpit to stop bits of bait, sand and rubbish washing back onto the cockpit sole itself.

The stern incorporates a large boarding platform that will appeal to those who like to swim or even don the diving gear.

A telescopic stainless ladder also aids access to the boat from the water.

PERFECT PARTNERS
The powerplant on the testboat was Yamaha's new 225hp four-stroke outboard. Having been in several boats powered by the big yammy since its launch, we weren't surprised at how quietly and smoothly it performed. It complemented the 702L perfectly.

Running the 702L through big boat chop was a non-event. The hull rode very softly and didn't exhibit any bad manners during our time at the helm. Taking it out through the Southport Seaway where the swell was running up to 2m, the big Signature felt right at home. Coming off the tops of waves at speed, the boat landed gently. There was no banging on re-entry, and all this was done with typical four-stroke quietness. Haines' variable deadrise is a distinct advantage when the weather turns sour. They have a patent on their SVDH (Signature Variable Deadrise Hull), which has an entry off the transom of 21° that pans out to 33° further forward. According to Haines this feature offers gentle wave-piercing and landings while offering excellent stability at rest. And it is stable - with people moving about, there was very little rock and roll at rest.

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK
Offshore anglers looking for a few more creature comforts than your average trailerable sportsfisher should take a closer look at this boat.

The testboat cruised comfortably at 3800rpm and 38kmh. Revving out to 6000rpm produced a top speed of 64.5kmh on the GPS.

This is one classy rig! One you won't have any problems selling mum on either, as the home comforts offered by the seating, galley and eating area options are a brilliant family attraction, making it a home away from home and a great mobile weekend retreat.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 702L
Price as tested: -
Options fitted:
Anchor winch, carpet, compass, galley ,telescopic ladder, cockpit lighting, livebait tank, deckwash,back to back seating,aft lounge, handheld shower,electric toilet, GME 27MHz radio, Clarion marine CD tuner and four speakers, Furuno NavNet GPS, chartplotter/sounder, EPIRB, fire extinguisher, coverings, deluxe bimini, clears and storm cover, twin batteries and isolator switch, Mackay Sensabrake system, Engine upgrade.
 
Priced from: $68,000 without trailer and including 200hp carburetted Mercury outboard.
 
GENERAL
Material: Fibreglass
Length (overall): 7.77m
Beam: 2.5m
Deadrise: Variable 21-33°
Rec/max hp: 200/250 - outboard 220/300 - sterndrive
Weight (hull only): 1250kg
 
CAPACITIES
Fuel: 260lt
Water: 90lt
 
ENGINE (as tested): Yamaha
Model: F225AETX four-stroke outboard
Rated hp: 225
Displacement: 3352cc
Weight: 268kg
Gearbox ratio: 15:30
Propeller: 15in Mercury Mirage
 
SUPPLIED BY: Haines Marine Industries Pty Ltd Wacol (Qld) tel (07) 3271 4400
 
For further information on the Signature range go to our New Boats Section.

 

 

Review Supplied By www.boatpoint.com.au
http://www.boatpoint.com.au/content/reviews/2002/haines-signature/signature-by-haines-702l-9279 

Haines Signature 702L - RedBook Review BACK


As either an offshore sportsfisher or a family cruiser, the Haines Signature 702L boasts enough features and attention to detail to pack one hell of a punch

Although the Haines Signature 702L was first launched back in September 2000, it has taken until now for us to get our hands on this trailerable flagship of the Signature range. And what better boat to test than Haines' own family boat, which has been loaded with just about every conceivable option.

The Haines Signature 702L is the perfect example of just how versatile a 7m boat can be. No doubt many hours of thought have gone into the design of this maxi trailerboat, which makes the maximum use of available space, enabling it to perform its duties as both an offshore sportsfisher and a family cruiser.

While there is no mistaking the stylish lines and impeccable gelcoat finish of a Signature, it is this boat's hidden treasures that make it stand out from the crowd.

The 702L features a purpose-built bowsprit ladder that folds out of the way when not in use. When extended, it allows people to board and disembark over the bow, for example, when back anchored off a beach with the bow toward the sand.

A Muir Horizon anchor winch is located inside the anchorwell with cleats each side of a sacrificial board that protects the gelcoat under the chain.

To maximise cabin volume there are no sidedecks, so access to the bow is via a large tinted Weaver hatch in the roof of the cabin or through a central opening in the windscreen aided by steps rebated in the edge of the companionway bulkhead.

A split stainless bowrail completes the foredeck hardware.

Inside the cabin, immediately behind the starboard bulkhead is an optional electric toilet. The cabin is lined and features user-friendly upholstery. With an infill in place, the V-berth converts into a large double berth.

WORRY-FREE WIRING
The dash fascia at the helm unclips and folds aft on hinges, providing access to the rear of the electronics and steering. This is a fantastic idea and makes upgrades and maintenance to the helm a breeze, as well as getting rid of the mass of wiring that often hangs inside the cabin. Seastar hydraulic steering with tilt-adjustable hub adds comfort while sitting or standing when underway.

The module supporting the passenger seat is another surprise package. The seat and its base tilt forward and the rear-cushioned seat on the module folds out and acts as a windbreak for the gas stove located inside. A sink and a pressurised freshwater tap also services this area.

The floor hatch adjacent to this concealed galley doubles as a cockpit table and when removed allows the chef to work wonders without having to bend over the stove.

The compartment for standing at the galley can also be used for storage or as an icebox. Both it and the cabin footwell feature a bung that drains to the bilge.

Two-tier sidepockets provide plenty of storage space below each gunwale and also incorporate horizontal rod or gaff racks.

At the aft end of the port side storage shelf, both fresh and saltwater washdowns are provided via bayonet fittings. A nozzle that doubles as a shower rose may be fitted to either for showering or deckwash purposes.

HIDDEN TREASURES
The transom also features several hidden treasures. On the port side is a livebait tank while on the starboard side twin batteries and isolation switch are located high in the cavity away from potential splashing.

A centrally located baitboard sits between the corner hatches and drains into the enginewell. It opens to reveal a lift-out tray, which when removed exposes a cavernous storage area for spare ropes, fenders and other gear that is better out of sight when not in use. This storage area may be accessed via a door in the face of the transom, so that fenders and the like may be removed or stored without going in through the top and having to lift out the baitboard trays.

Another hatch in the transom bulkhead reveals five Plano tackle draws that can hold a multitude of lures and terminal tackle.

The cockpit is self-draining, with a gutter around the outside of the cockpit to stop bits of bait, sand and rubbish washing back onto the cockpit sole itself.

The stern incorporates a large boarding platform that will appeal to those who like to swim or even don the diving gear.

A telescopic stainless ladder also aids access to the boat from the water.

PERFECT PARTNERS
The powerplant on the testboat was Yamaha's new 225hp four-stroke outboard. Having been in several boats powered by the big yammy since its launch, we weren't surprised at how quietly and smoothly it performed. It complemented the 702L perfectly.

Running the 702L through big boat chop was a non-event. The hull rode very softly and didn't exhibit any bad manners during our time at the helm. Taking it out through the Southport Seaway where the swell was running up to 2m, the big Signature felt right at home. Coming off the tops of waves at speed, the boat landed gently. There was no banging on re-entry, and all this was done with typical four-stroke quietness. Haines' variable deadrise is a distinct advantage when the weather turns sour. They have a patent on their SVDH (Signature Variable Deadrise Hull), which has an entry off the transom of 21° that pans out to 33° further forward. According to Haines this feature offers gentle wave-piercing and landings while offering excellent stability at rest. And it is stable - with people moving about, there was very little rock and roll at rest.

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK
Offshore anglers looking for a few more creature comforts than your average trailerable sportsfisher should take a closer look at this boat.

The testboat cruised comfortably at 3800rpm and 38kmh. Revving out to 6000rpm produced a top speed of 64.5kmh on the GPS.

This is one classy rig! One you won't have any problems selling mum on either, as the home comforts offered by the seating, galley and eating area options are a brilliant family attraction, making it a home away from home and a great mobile weekend retreat.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 702L
Price as tested: $96,200
Options fitted:
Anchor winch, carpet, compass, galley ,telescopic ladder, cockpit lighting, livebait tank, deckwash,back to back seating,aft lounge, handheld shower,electric toilet, GME 27MHz radio, Clarion marine CD tuner and four speakers, Furuno NavNet GPS, chartplotter/sounder, EPIRB, fire extinguisher, coverings, deluxe bimini, clears and storm cover, twin batteries and isolator switch, Mackay Sensabrake system, Engine upgrade.
 
Priced from: $68,000 without trailer and including 200hp carburetted Mercury outboard.
 
GENERAL
Material: Fibreglass
Length (overall): 7.77m
Beam: 2.5m
Deadrise: Variable 21-33°
Rec/max hp: 200/250 - outboard 220/300 - sterndrive
Weight (hull only): 1250kg
 
CAPACITIES
Fuel: 260lt
Water: 90lt
 
ENGINE (as tested): Yamaha
Model: F225AETX four-stroke outboard
Rated hp: 225
Displacement: 3352cc
Weight: 268kg
Gearbox ratio: 15:30
Propeller: 15in Mercury Mirage
 
SUPPLIED BY: Haines Marine Industries Pty Ltd Wacol (Qld) tel (07) 3271 4400
 
For further information on the Signature range go to our New Boats Section.


Review Supplied By www.redbook.com.au
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2002/haines-signature/signature-by-haines-702l-9279?csn_tnet=true

Videos


Upholstery colours


Personalise your Siganture

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Hull colours [Gellcoat]


Trim colours


Personalise your Siganture

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours
702L

Optional Extras

Configurations

Specifications

Moulded length with bowsprit 7.77m
Length 6.86m
Beam 2.50M
Deadrise 21-33º
Fuel 240L
Water 38L OPT
Berths 2
Power outboard 150-300hp
Transom height 25"
Max outboard weight 350kg
Hull weight 1,400kg approx
Towing weight 2,800-3,200kg
BMT length 9.2m
BMT height 2.43m
BMT width 2.50m
Max people 8/720kg
Max load 1,000kg (single) / 1,090kg (twin)

Haines Signature 702L - Boat Point Review BACK

As either an offshore sportsfisher or a family cruiser, the Haines Signature 702L boasts enough features and attention to detail to pack one hell of a punch

Although the Haines Signature 702L was first launched back in September 2000, it has taken until now for us to get our hands on this trailerable flagship of the Signature range. And what better boat to test than Haines' own family boat, which has been loaded with just about every conceivable option.

The Haines Signature 702L is the perfect example of just how versatile a 7m boat can be. No doubt many hours of thought have gone into the design of this maxi trailerboat, which makes the maximum use of available space, enabling it to perform its duties as both an offshore sportsfisher and a family cruiser.

While there is no mistaking the stylish lines and impeccable gelcoat finish of a Signature, it is this boat's hidden treasures that make it stand out from the crowd.

The 702L features a purpose-built bowsprit ladder that folds out of the way when not in use. When extended, it allows people to board and disembark over the bow, for example, when back anchored off a beach with the bow toward the sand.

A Muir Horizon anchor winch is located inside the anchorwell with cleats each side of a sacrificial board that protects the gelcoat under the chain.

To maximise cabin volume there are no sidedecks, so access to the bow is via a large tinted Weaver hatch in the roof of the cabin or through a central opening in the windscreen aided by steps rebated in the edge of the companionway bulkhead.

A split stainless bowrail completes the foredeck hardware.

Inside the cabin, immediately behind the starboard bulkhead is an optional electric toilet. The cabin is lined and features user-friendly upholstery. With an infill in place, the V-berth converts into a large double berth.

WORRY-FREE WIRING
The dash fascia at the helm unclips and folds aft on hinges, providing access to the rear of the electronics and steering. This is a fantastic idea and makes upgrades and maintenance to the helm a breeze, as well as getting rid of the mass of wiring that often hangs inside the cabin. Seastar hydraulic steering with tilt-adjustable hub adds comfort while sitting or standing when underway.

The module supporting the passenger seat is another surprise package. The seat and its base tilt forward and the rear-cushioned seat on the module folds out and acts as a windbreak for the gas stove located inside. A sink and a pressurised freshwater tap also services this area.

The floor hatch adjacent to this concealed galley doubles as a cockpit table and when removed allows the chef to work wonders without having to bend over the stove.

The compartment for standing at the galley can also be used for storage or as an icebox. Both it and the cabin footwell feature a bung that drains to the bilge.

Two-tier sidepockets provide plenty of storage space below each gunwale and also incorporate horizontal rod or gaff racks.

At the aft end of the port side storage shelf, both fresh and saltwater washdowns are provided via bayonet fittings. A nozzle that doubles as a shower rose may be fitted to either for showering or deckwash purposes.

HIDDEN TREASURES
The transom also features several hidden treasures. On the port side is a livebait tank while on the starboard side twin batteries and isolation switch are located high in the cavity away from potential splashing.

A centrally located baitboard sits between the corner hatches and drains into the enginewell. It opens to reveal a lift-out tray, which when removed exposes a cavernous storage area for spare ropes, fenders and other gear that is better out of sight when not in use. This storage area may be accessed via a door in the face of the transom, so that fenders and the like may be removed or stored without going in through the top and having to lift out the baitboard trays.

Another hatch in the transom bulkhead reveals five Plano tackle draws that can hold a multitude of lures and terminal tackle.

The cockpit is self-draining, with a gutter around the outside of the cockpit to stop bits of bait, sand and rubbish washing back onto the cockpit sole itself.

The stern incorporates a large boarding platform that will appeal to those who like to swim or even don the diving gear.

A telescopic stainless ladder also aids access to the boat from the water.

PERFECT PARTNERS
The powerplant on the testboat was Yamaha's new 225hp four-stroke outboard. Having been in several boats powered by the big yammy since its launch, we weren't surprised at how quietly and smoothly it performed. It complemented the 702L perfectly.

Running the 702L through big boat chop was a non-event. The hull rode very softly and didn't exhibit any bad manners during our time at the helm. Taking it out through the Southport Seaway where the swell was running up to 2m, the big Signature felt right at home. Coming off the tops of waves at speed, the boat landed gently. There was no banging on re-entry, and all this was done with typical four-stroke quietness. Haines' variable deadrise is a distinct advantage when the weather turns sour. They have a patent on their SVDH (Signature Variable Deadrise Hull), which has an entry off the transom of 21° that pans out to 33° further forward. According to Haines this feature offers gentle wave-piercing and landings while offering excellent stability at rest. And it is stable - with people moving about, there was very little rock and roll at rest.

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK
Offshore anglers looking for a few more creature comforts than your average trailerable sportsfisher should take a closer look at this boat.

The testboat cruised comfortably at 3800rpm and 38kmh. Revving out to 6000rpm produced a top speed of 64.5kmh on the GPS.

This is one classy rig! One you won't have any problems selling mum on either, as the home comforts offered by the seating, galley and eating area options are a brilliant family attraction, making it a home away from home and a great mobile weekend retreat.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 702L
Price as tested: -
Options fitted:
Anchor winch, carpet, compass, galley ,telescopic ladder, cockpit lighting, livebait tank, deckwash,back to back seating,aft lounge, handheld shower,electric toilet, GME 27MHz radio, Clarion marine CD tuner and four speakers, Furuno NavNet GPS, chartplotter/sounder, EPIRB, fire extinguisher, coverings, deluxe bimini, clears and storm cover, twin batteries and isolator switch, Mackay Sensabrake system, Engine upgrade.
 
Priced from: $68,000 without trailer and including 200hp carburetted Mercury outboard.
 
GENERAL
Material: Fibreglass
Length (overall): 7.77m
Beam: 2.5m
Deadrise: Variable 21-33°
Rec/max hp: 200/250 - outboard 220/300 - sterndrive
Weight (hull only): 1250kg
 
CAPACITIES
Fuel: 260lt
Water: 90lt
 
ENGINE (as tested): Yamaha
Model: F225AETX four-stroke outboard
Rated hp: 225
Displacement: 3352cc
Weight: 268kg
Gearbox ratio: 15:30
Propeller: 15in Mercury Mirage
 
SUPPLIED BY: Haines Marine Industries Pty Ltd Wacol (Qld) tel (07) 3271 4400
 
For further information on the Signature range go to our New Boats Section.

 

 

Review Supplied By www.boatpoint.com.au
http://www.boatpoint.com.au/content/reviews/2002/haines-signature/signature-by-haines-702l-9279 

Haines Signature 702L - RedBook Review BACK

As either an offshore sportsfisher or a family cruiser, the Haines Signature 702L boasts enough features and attention to detail to pack one hell of a punch

Although the Haines Signature 702L was first launched back in September 2000, it has taken until now for us to get our hands on this trailerable flagship of the Signature range. And what better boat to test than Haines' own family boat, which has been loaded with just about every conceivable option.

The Haines Signature 702L is the perfect example of just how versatile a 7m boat can be. No doubt many hours of thought have gone into the design of this maxi trailerboat, which makes the maximum use of available space, enabling it to perform its duties as both an offshore sportsfisher and a family cruiser.

While there is no mistaking the stylish lines and impeccable gelcoat finish of a Signature, it is this boat's hidden treasures that make it stand out from the crowd.

The 702L features a purpose-built bowsprit ladder that folds out of the way when not in use. When extended, it allows people to board and disembark over the bow, for example, when back anchored off a beach with the bow toward the sand.

A Muir Horizon anchor winch is located inside the anchorwell with cleats each side of a sacrificial board that protects the gelcoat under the chain.

To maximise cabin volume there are no sidedecks, so access to the bow is via a large tinted Weaver hatch in the roof of the cabin or through a central opening in the windscreen aided by steps rebated in the edge of the companionway bulkhead.

A split stainless bowrail completes the foredeck hardware.

Inside the cabin, immediately behind the starboard bulkhead is an optional electric toilet. The cabin is lined and features user-friendly upholstery. With an infill in place, the V-berth converts into a large double berth.

WORRY-FREE WIRING
The dash fascia at the helm unclips and folds aft on hinges, providing access to the rear of the electronics and steering. This is a fantastic idea and makes upgrades and maintenance to the helm a breeze, as well as getting rid of the mass of wiring that often hangs inside the cabin. Seastar hydraulic steering with tilt-adjustable hub adds comfort while sitting or standing when underway.

The module supporting the passenger seat is another surprise package. The seat and its base tilt forward and the rear-cushioned seat on the module folds out and acts as a windbreak for the gas stove located inside. A sink and a pressurised freshwater tap also services this area.

The floor hatch adjacent to this concealed galley doubles as a cockpit table and when removed allows the chef to work wonders without having to bend over the stove.

The compartment for standing at the galley can also be used for storage or as an icebox. Both it and the cabin footwell feature a bung that drains to the bilge.

Two-tier sidepockets provide plenty of storage space below each gunwale and also incorporate horizontal rod or gaff racks.

At the aft end of the port side storage shelf, both fresh and saltwater washdowns are provided via bayonet fittings. A nozzle that doubles as a shower rose may be fitted to either for showering or deckwash purposes.

HIDDEN TREASURES
The transom also features several hidden treasures. On the port side is a livebait tank while on the starboard side twin batteries and isolation switch are located high in the cavity away from potential splashing.

A centrally located baitboard sits between the corner hatches and drains into the enginewell. It opens to reveal a lift-out tray, which when removed exposes a cavernous storage area for spare ropes, fenders and other gear that is better out of sight when not in use. This storage area may be accessed via a door in the face of the transom, so that fenders and the like may be removed or stored without going in through the top and having to lift out the baitboard trays.

Another hatch in the transom bulkhead reveals five Plano tackle draws that can hold a multitude of lures and terminal tackle.

The cockpit is self-draining, with a gutter around the outside of the cockpit to stop bits of bait, sand and rubbish washing back onto the cockpit sole itself.

The stern incorporates a large boarding platform that will appeal to those who like to swim or even don the diving gear.

A telescopic stainless ladder also aids access to the boat from the water.

PERFECT PARTNERS
The powerplant on the testboat was Yamaha's new 225hp four-stroke outboard. Having been in several boats powered by the big yammy since its launch, we weren't surprised at how quietly and smoothly it performed. It complemented the 702L perfectly.

Running the 702L through big boat chop was a non-event. The hull rode very softly and didn't exhibit any bad manners during our time at the helm. Taking it out through the Southport Seaway where the swell was running up to 2m, the big Signature felt right at home. Coming off the tops of waves at speed, the boat landed gently. There was no banging on re-entry, and all this was done with typical four-stroke quietness. Haines' variable deadrise is a distinct advantage when the weather turns sour. They have a patent on their SVDH (Signature Variable Deadrise Hull), which has an entry off the transom of 21° that pans out to 33° further forward. According to Haines this feature offers gentle wave-piercing and landings while offering excellent stability at rest. And it is stable - with people moving about, there was very little rock and roll at rest.

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK
Offshore anglers looking for a few more creature comforts than your average trailerable sportsfisher should take a closer look at this boat.

The testboat cruised comfortably at 3800rpm and 38kmh. Revving out to 6000rpm produced a top speed of 64.5kmh on the GPS.

This is one classy rig! One you won't have any problems selling mum on either, as the home comforts offered by the seating, galley and eating area options are a brilliant family attraction, making it a home away from home and a great mobile weekend retreat.

 

HAINES SIGNATURE 702L
Price as tested: $96,200
Options fitted:
Anchor winch, carpet, compass, galley ,telescopic ladder, cockpit lighting, livebait tank, deckwash,back to back seating,aft lounge, handheld shower,electric toilet, GME 27MHz radio, Clarion marine CD tuner and four speakers, Furuno NavNet GPS, chartplotter/sounder, EPIRB, fire extinguisher, coverings, deluxe bimini, clears and storm cover, twin batteries and isolator switch, Mackay Sensabrake system, Engine upgrade.
 
Priced from: $68,000 without trailer and including 200hp carburetted Mercury outboard.
 
GENERAL
Material: Fibreglass
Length (overall): 7.77m
Beam: 2.5m
Deadrise: Variable 21-33°
Rec/max hp: 200/250 - outboard 220/300 - sterndrive
Weight (hull only): 1250kg
 
CAPACITIES
Fuel: 260lt
Water: 90lt
 
ENGINE (as tested): Yamaha
Model: F225AETX four-stroke outboard
Rated hp: 225
Displacement: 3352cc
Weight: 268kg
Gearbox ratio: 15:30
Propeller: 15in Mercury Mirage
 
SUPPLIED BY: Haines Marine Industries Pty Ltd Wacol (Qld) tel (07) 3271 4400
 
For further information on the Signature range go to our New Boats Section.


Review Supplied By www.redbook.com.au
http://www.redbook.com.au/boat-reviews/2002/haines-signature/signature-by-haines-702l-9279?csn_tnet=true

Videos

Upholstery colours

Signature™ boats and Nautolex are proud to be associated with the PreFixx range of maritime seat vinyls - standard on all Signature™ models. Unsurpassed cleanability and wear from a marine seating fabric, PreFixx protection offers you the latest technology to remove stains that could never be removed before. With a test proven abrasion resistance, PreFixx protected products protect you from high maintenance costs and from frequent reupholstery costs. PreFixx protected Nautolex materials - cleanable with strong, active solvents without damage.

Primary Upholstery Colours
Secondary Upholstery Colours
Stitching Colours

Trim colours

Standard Cloth Trim Colours
Upgrade Colours